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Residential Facilities, Assisted Living, and Nursing Homes ...

https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/residential-facilities-assisted-living-and-nursing-homes
Assisted living facilities range in size from as few as 25 residents to 120 or more. Typically, a few "levels of care" are offered, with residents paying more for higher levels of care. Assisted living residents usually live in their own apartments or rooms and share common areas.

Assisted living and nursing homes | National Institute on ...

https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/topics/assisted-living-and-nursing-homes
Residential Facilities, Assisted Living, and Nursing Homes. Learn about facility-based long-term care services, including assisted living, nursing homes, continuing care retirement communities, and other residential facilities.

Site Search | National Institute on Aging

https://www.nia.nih.gov/site-search/bnVyc2luZyBob21lcw==
If you're considering nursing homes or assisted living facilities, read about things to consider and questions to ask. Residential Facilities, Assisted Living, and Nursing Homes. Learn about facility-based long-term care services, including assisted living, nursing homes, continuing care retirement communities, and other residential facilities.

Finding Long-Term Care for a Person with Alzheimer's ...

https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/finding-long-term-care-person-alzheimers
Some assisted living facilities have special Alzheimer’s units. These units have staff who check on and care for people with Alzheimer’s disease. You will need to pay for the cost of the room or apartment, and you may need to pay extra for any special care.

What Are Palliative Care and Hospice Care? | National ...

https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/what-are-palliative-care-and-hospice-care
Finding care in nursing homes, assisted living facilities, or hospitals may be more difficult or complicated during COVID-19. These facilities may continue to update their services and policies to comply with state department of health and CDC guidelines to protect the health and safety of people receiving care as well as staff.

Aging in Place: Growing Older at Home | National Institute ...

https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/aging-place-growing-older-home
It's possible that paying for a few services out of pocket could cost less than moving into an independent living, assisted living, or long-term care facility. And you will have your wish of still living on your own. Resources like Benefits.gov and BenefitsCheckUp® can help you find out about possible benefits you might qualify for.

Paying for Care | National Institute on Aging

https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/paying-care
How people pay for long-term care—whether delivered at home or in a hospital, assisted living facility, or nursing home—depends on their financial situation and the kinds of services they use. Often, they rely on a variety of payment sources, including personal funds, government programs, and private financing options.

How to Choose a Nursing Home | National Institute on Aging

https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/how-choose-nursing-home
Learn about residential facilities, assisted living, and other long-term care options. Read about this topic in Spanish. Lea sobre este tema en español. This content is provided by the NIH National Institute on Aging (NIA). NIA scientists and other experts review this content to ensure it is accurate and up to date.

What Is Long-Term Care? | National Institute on Aging

https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/what-long-term-care
The most common type of long-term care is personal care—help with everyday activities, also called "activities of daily living." These activities include bathing, dressing, grooming, using the toilet, eating, and moving around—for example, getting out of bed and into a chair.

Elder Abuse | National Institute on Aging

https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/elder-abuse
Abuse can happen in many places, including the older person's home, a family member's house, an assisted living facility, or a nursing home. The mistreatment of older adults can be by family members, strangers, health care providers, caregivers, or friends. Types of Abuse. There are many types of abuse:

When It's Time to Leave Home | National Institute on Aging

https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/when-its-time-leave-home
Move to an assisted-living facility; Move to a long-term care facility; Move in with a family member; Some families find a conference call is a good way to talk together about the pros and cons of each option. The goal of this call is to come up with a plan that works for everyone, especially your parent.

COVID-19 Resources for Older Adults & Caregivers | NIA

https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/government-covid-19-resources-older-adults
Government COVID-19 resources for older adults. COVID-19 is a novel disease requiring rapid responses and lifestyle changes on multiple fronts. Learn about government information and resources for the public below. Visit your state health department website for the latest coronavirus information, resources, and guidance in your area.

Sample Menus: Healthy Eating for Older Adults | National ...

https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/sample-menus-healthy-eating-older-adults
Read and share this infographic to learn about making smart food choices for healthy aging.. Planning a day’s worth of meals using smart food choices might seem overwhelming at first. Here are some sample menus to show you how easy it can be. These menus provide 2,000 calories a day and do not exceed the recommended amount of sodium or calories from saturated fats and added sugars.

What Is Respite Care? | National Institute on Aging

https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/what-respite-care
Respite care provides short-term relief for primary caregivers.It can be arranged for just an afternoon or for several days or weeks. Care can be provided at home, in a healthcare facility, or at an adult day center.

Where Can I Find Care for a Dying Relative? | National ...

https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/where-can-i-find-care-dying-relative
Some may already be living in a nursing home. There is no right place to die. And, of course, where we die is not always something we get to decide. But, if given the choice, each person and/or his or her family should consider which type of care makes the most sense, where that kind of care can be provided, whether family and friends are ...

Getting Help with Alzheimer's Caregiving | National ...

https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/getting-help-alzheimers-caregiving
If you receive hospice services in an assisted living facility or nursing home, you may need to pay room and board. You must pay all costs not covered by Medicare, Medicaid, or other insurance. Some nonprofit organizations and hospice providers help cover hospice costs on a sliding scale for low-income patients.

What To Do After Someone Dies | National Institute on Aging

https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/what-do-after-someone-dies
The Living Bank 800-528-2971 info@livingbank.org www.livingbank.org. Social Security Administration 800-772-1213 (toll-free) 800-325-0778 (TTY/toll-free) www.ssa.gov. This content is provided by the NIH National Institute on Aging (NIA). NIA scientists and other experts review this content to ensure it is accurate and up to date.

Health Disparities and Aging | NIA

https://www.nia.nih.gov/about/aging-strategic-directions-research/goal-health...
Economic circumstances can determine whether an individual can afford quality health care and proper nutrition from early life into old age. Individual and family financial resources and health insurance often determine whether an older adult enters an assisted living facility or nursing home or stays at home to be cared for by family members.

Long-Term Care | National Institute on Aging

https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/caregiving/long-term-care
Learn about facility-based long-term care services, including assisted living, nursing homes, continuing care retirement communities, and other residential facilities. How to Choose a Nursing Home. If you're considering nursing homes or assisted living facilities, read about things to consider and questions to ask.

How to Share Caregiving Responsibilities with Family ...

https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/how-share-caregiving-responsibilities-family-members
In time, the person receiving care may have to move to assisted living or a nursing home. If that happens, the primary caregiver will need your support. You can help select a facility. The primary caregiver may need help adjusting to the person’s absence or to living alone at home. Just listening may not sound like much help, but often it is.