Skip to main content

Research Resources

Use the NIA Research Resources database to find NIA-supported scientific resources, datasets, informatics resources, and more. Search by keyword, resource type, or NIA Division or IRP. 

Health Databases

English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA)

The English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA) is a longitudinal study that collects multidisciplinary data from a representative sample of the English population aged 50 and older. The survey data are designed to be used for the investigation of a broad set of topics relevant to understanding the aging process. Both objective and subjective data are collected covering themes such as: health trajectories, disability and healthy life expectancy, the determinants of economic position in older age; the links between economic position, physical health, cognition, and mental health; the nature and timing of retirement and post-retirement labor market activity; household and family structure, social networks and social supports; patterns, determinants, and consequences of social, civic, and cultural participation and predictors of well-being. ELSA is led by Professor Sir Michael Marmot and is jointly run by teams at University College London (UCL), the Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS), National Centre for Social Research, and the University of Manchester.


Gateway to Global Aging Data

The Gateway to Global Aging is a platform for population survey data on aging around the world. You can access data from 11 longitudinal studies on aging through this site, which is hosted by the University of Southern California’s Program on Global Aging, Health, and Policy. The project’s goal is to provide the resources to support cross-national research on aging: a comprehensive digital library of survey questions, a search engine that finds concordance information across surveys, and a set of harmonized or identically defined variables for analysis. You can also use a data manipulation tool on the website.


Health and Retirement Study (HRS)

The University of Michigan Health and Retirement Study (HRS) is a longitudinal panel study that surveys a representative sample of more than 26,000 Americans over the age of 50 every two years. Supported by the National Institute on Aging (NIA U01AG009740) and the Social Security Administration, the HRS explores the changes in labor force participation and the health transitions that individuals undergo toward the end of their work lives and in the years that follow. Since its launch in 1992, the study has collected information about income, work, assets, pension plans, health insurance, disability, physical health and functioning, cognitive functioning, and health care expenditures. Through its unique and in-depth interviews, the HRS provides an invaluable and growing body of multidisciplinary data that researchers can use to address important questions about the challenges and opportunities of aging


Health and Retirement Study Sister Studies

The Health and Retirement Study (HRS), funded by NIA and the Social Security Administration, has become the model for a growing network of longitudinal aging studies around the world. Learn more about HRS international sister studies: https://hrs.isr.umich.edu/about/international-sister-studies


Integrative Analysis of Longitudinal Studies on Aging (IALSA)

The IALSA research network is a collaborative research infrastructure for coordinated interdisciplinary, cross-national research aimed at the integrative understanding of within-person aging-related changes in health and cognition. The IALSA network is currently comprised of over 25 longitudinal studies on aging, spanning eight countries, with a combined sample size of approximately 70,000 individuals. These studies represent a mix of population representative, volunteer, and special population samples. Within the network, data have been collected on individuals aged 18 to over 100, with birth cohorts ranging from 1880 to 1980, and historical periods from 1956 to the present. Between-occasion intervals range from 6 months to 17 years (the majority 1-5 years), with between 2 and 32 (mainly 3-5) measurement occasions spanning 4 to 48 years of within-person assessment.


International Network for the Demographic Evaluation of Populations and their Health (INDEPTH)

INDEPTH is a global network of HDSSs. Its 41 member centres observe the life events of millions of people in 20 LMICs in Africa, Asia and Oceania. Since its inception in 1998, the network has gathered a treasure trove of robust data, and is uniquely positioned both to answer the most pressing questions on health, population dynamics and development, and to provide policy-makers and donors with evidence on the impact of interventions.

This network of health and demographic surveillance systems (HDSSs) collects data from whole communities over extended time periods that reflect health and population problems in LMICs. By monitoring new health threats, tracking population changes through fertility rates, death rates and migration, and measuring the effect of policy interventions on communities, HDSSs provide information that enables policy-makers to make informed decisions and to adapt their programs to changing conditions.


Interplay of Genes and Environment Across Multiple Studies (IGEMS)

The Interplay of Genes and Environment across Multiple Studies (IGEMS) group is a consortium of eight longitudinal twin studies established to explore the nature of social context effects and gene-environment interplay in late-life functioning. The resulting analysis of the combined data from over 17,500 participants aged 25–102 at baseline (including nearly 2,600 monogygotic and 4,300 dizygotic twin pairs and over 1,700 family members) aims to understand why early-life adversity, and social factors such as isolation and loneliness, are associated with diverse outcomes including mortality, physical functioning (health, functional ability), and psychological functioning (well-being, cognition), particularly in later life.


Korean Longitudinal Study of Aging (KLoSA)

Korea became an aging society in 2000, as the proportion of those 65 or older reached 7% of the population. Lacking in basic data on ageing, Korea needs a structured set of statistical data. Institutional reform and policy making in preparation against the aged society requires systematic build-up of data that can track individuals' labor participation, income and asset status, spending patterns, retirement decisions, impact of social welfare, health, and intra-family transfer of income, among others. The purpose of KLoSA is to create the basic data needed to devise and implement effective social, economic policies to address the trends that emerge in the process of population ageing. The data will help identify and observe different dimensions of an aged society, build datasets that enable studies in different fields, and generate data comparable with similar panel studies in other countries (e.g., U.S., Europe) that can provide the basis for policy making and academic studies.


Longitudinal Aging Study in India (LASI)

Data are lacking on the health, social support, and economic security of India’s growing elderly population, and concern is mounting about the well-being of this expanding group. By assembling a research team of demographers, economists, medical doctors, sociologists, and public health and policy experts, LASI aims to supply the data needed to take stock of the situation of India’s elderly population. It is hopedhttps://www.hsph.harvard.edu/pgda/major-projects/lasi-2/ that this evidence base will contribute to cross-national studies of aging and will inform the design of policies that can protect and support the growing elderly community.


Midlife in the United States

MIDUS (Midlife in the U.S.) is a national sample of continental U.S. residents, aged 25 to 74, who were first interviewed in 1995-96. The original study was conceived by a multidisciplinary team of investigators interested in the influence of psychological and social factors on health, broadly defined, as people age from early adulthood to later life. MIDUS is a collaborative, interdisciplinary investigation of patterns, predictors, and consequences of midlife development in the areas of physical health, psychological well-being, and social responsibility. The scientific scope of the study was extended by adding comprehensive biological assessments on a subsample of respondents. In its longitudinal extension, MIDUS thus became a forum for investigating health as an integrative process, which involved combining the behavioral and social sciences together with bio-medically oriented research.