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Milestone 4.C

Continue to develop animal models with higher predictive validity for use in preclinical drug development and to accelerate the discovery of translationally relevant disease mechanisms and treatment strategies.


Success Criteria

Expand the existing open-source/open-science translational infrastructure for next generation AD animal models by developing:

  • New transgenic mouse models with humanized immune systems expressing AD risk related human genes for use in preclinical drug development and to gain a better understanding of the role of the immune system in risk and progression of AD/ADRD.

  • Non-human primate models (such as marmosets genetically engineered with Alzheimer’s disease risk variants) and other non-human primate models for use in comparative aging biology and integrative physiology studies of AD and to bridge the translational gap between rodents and humans

  • Animal models for the neuropsychiatric symptoms of AD.

Summary of Key Accomplishments

NIA's New Un-conventional Animal Models of Alzheimer’s Disease is an initiative to encourage research aimed at developing and characterizing innovative non-rodent mammalian models of late-onset (sporadic) AD.

These new models are expected to recapitulate molecular, cellular, neuropathological, behavioral, and/or cognitive features of late-onset AD. Seven highly cross-disciplinary projects have been initiated. One of the funded grants is supporting the Dog Aging Project, a consortium aimed at understanding the biological aging process, including age-related cognitive changes and dementia, in companion dogs through large-scale longitudinal study and clinical evaluation.

This information is current as of July 2022.


Research Implementation Area
Translational Tools, Infrastructure, and Capabilities
Timeline
2018–2024
Status
In Progress

Accomplishments/Implementation Activities

Funding Initiatives

Research Programs and Resources

Research Highlights

Relevant Recommendations

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