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Workshop | The Future of Population-Based Studies in Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Dementia Research: Setting Future Scientific Priorities

Audience

Researchers interested in learning about the use and interpretation of data from population-based studies on aging and Alzheimer’s disease are invited to join this workshop.

Dates

October 31, 2023 | 8:00 a.m. – 4:45 p.m. ET
November 1, 2023 | 8:00 a.m. – 3:15 p.m. ET

Location

The workshop will be a hybrid meeting held in-person in Bethesda, MD and via Zoom.

Purpose and Background

As research around Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias grows, there’s an opportunity to ensure that population-based studies are more representative of the increasingly diverse older adult population and able to inform precision medicine efforts moving forward is essential. The Division of Neuroscience within the National Institute on Aging will sponsor a 2-day hybrid workshop on The Future of Population-Based Studies in Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Dementias.

The objectives will be to:

  1. Foster the development of research collaborations among investigators involved in research of population-based AD/ADRD studies.
  2. Identify and leverage resources available to enhance AD/ADRD population-based research.
  3. Identify avenues to enhance existing data and supplement the collection of new data for AD/ADRD population-based research.
  4. Encourage on-going discussions regarding the development of scientific priorities focused on informing future precision-based intervention and prevention strategies for AD/ADRD among US populations.

Registration

Register for this workshop

*Online registration will close on October 1.

Agenda

Tuesday, October 31

7:00 – 8:00 a.m. Check-in for in-person attendees

8:00 – 8:30 a.m. Welcome and meeting logistics, Damali Martin, Ph.D., M.P.H., Chief, Population Studies and Genetics Branch, NIA

8:30 - 10:45 a.m. Theme 1: Diversifying populations
Moderator: Damali Martin, Ph.D., M.P.H., Chief, Population Studies and Genetics Branch, NIA

  • Overview of current ADRD study populations, needs and gaps moving forward, Rachel Whitmer, Ph.D., UC Davis
  • A rare and underserved segment of the AD population, Brad Dickerson, MD, Massachusetts General Hospital
  • Resilience to Alzheimer's and related dementias as a window into disease mechanisms, Stacy L. Andersen, Ph.D., Boston University
  • Down syndrome and autism: Current knowledge and opportunities, Ben Handen, Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh
  • Increasing representation of sexual and gender minorities in Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias research, Jason Flatt, Ph.D., University of Nevada Las Vegas
  • Inspiring conundrums posed by research with indigenous populations, Hillard Kaplan, Ph.D., Chapman University
  • Q&A Discussion

10:45 – 11:00 a.m. Break

11:00 – 12:00 p.m. Theme 1: Breakout group discussions — Diversifying populations

Moderator: Damali Martin, Ph.D., M.P.H., Chief, Population Studies and Genetics Branch, NIA

  • What are the scientific priorities? What is primed to happen now vs. needs more tech/development?
  • What to dive deeper / focus on?
  • What are the collaborative opportunities with other ICs and funding agencies?

12:00 – 1:00 p.m. Lunch

1:00 – 3:15 p.m. Theme 2: Infrastructure needs for current and future population studies

Moderator: Damali Martin, Ph.D., M.P.H., Chief, Population Studies and Genetics Branch, NIA

  • Whose data is it anyway? Data and resource sharing to advance mechanistic insights into the etiology of Alzheimer's disease and Alzheimer's disease related dementias (AD/ADRD), David Bennett, M.D., Rush University 
  • Getting behind the smoke and mirrors on data sharing: Lessons from Framingham and other legacy studies, Rhoda Au, Ph.D., Boston University
  • Opportunities and challenges for AD/ADRD research in traditional non-AD/ADRD cohorts, Jose Luchsinger, M.D., Columbia University 
  • Opportunities and challenges of integration across the AD data ecosystem, Anna Greenwood, Ph.D., Sage Bionetworks
  • Leveraging electronic medical records data and machine learning to better understand Alzheimer’s disease, Marina Sirota, Ph.D., University of California San Francisco
  • Making Cohorts Discoverable: the Biomedical Research Informatics Computing System (BRICS), Matthew McAuliffe, Ph.D., NIH 
  • Q&A Discussion

3:15 - 3:30 p.m. Break

3:30 – 4:30 p.m. Theme 2: Breakout group discussions — Infrastructure needs for current and future population studies

Moderator: Damali Martin, Ph.D., M.P.H., Chief, Population Studies and Genetics Branch, NIA

  • What are the scientific priorities? What is primed to happen now vs. needs more tech/development?
  • What to dive deeper / focus on?
  • What are the collaborative opportunities with other ICs and funding agencies?

4:30 – 4:45 p.m. Closing Remarks, Preparation for 2nd day, Damali Martin, Ph.D., M.P.H., Chief, Population Studies and Genetics Branch, NIA

4:45 p.m. Adjourn

Wednesday, November 1

7:00 – 8:00 a.m. Check-in for in-person attendees 

8:00 a.m. – 8:30 a.m. Summary of day 1, charge for day 2, Richard Kwok, Ph.D., Program Director, Population Studies and Genetics Branch, NIA    

8:30 – 10:45 a.m. Theme 3: Life course environmental influences on Alzheimer’s disease risk

Moderator: Richard Kwok, Ph.D., Program Director, Population Studies and Genetics Branch, NIA    

  • Assessing environmental exposures across the lifespan for epidemiologic studies, Marc Weisskopf, Ph.D., Harvard University
  • Considering climate adaptation strategies to slow age-related cognitive decline, Carina Gronlund, Ph.D., University of Michigan
  • Aging in a changing climate: Harnessing the exposome to understand social and environmental determinants, Joan Casey, Ph.D., University of Washington
  • Proxies for environmental exposures (education as an exposure), Jennifer Manly, Ph.D., Columbia University
  • Exposomics: omic-scale analysis of the environment for Alzheimer’s disease, Gary Miller, Ph.D., Columbia University
  • The Neighborhoods Study: Linking brain banks (and other AD biorepositories) to the social exposome, Amy Kind, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin
  • Q&A Discussion

10:45 – 11:00 a.m. Break

11:00 – 12:00 p.m. Theme 3: Breakout group discussions — Life course environmental influences on Alzheimer’s disease risk

Moderator: Richard Kwok, Ph.D., Program Director, Population Studies and Genetics Branch, NIA

  • What are the scientific priorities? What is primed to happen now vs. needs more tech/development?
  • What to dive deeper / focus on?
  • What are the collaborative opportunities with other ICs and funding agencies?

12:00 – 1:00 p.m. Lunch

1:00 – 3:00 p.m. Report back from breakout groups and discussions

Moderator: Richard Kwok, Ph.D., Program Director, Population Studies and Genetics Branch, NIA

3:00 – 3:15 p.m. Closing remarks, Damali Martin, Ph.D., M.P.H., Chief, Population Studies and Genetics Branch, NIA

3:15 p.m. Adjourn

Contact Information

Please contact Tayona Pearson (tayona.pearson@nih.gov) for questions you may have about the workshop.

NIA Future of Population Studies Planning Group Members:

Reasonable Accommodation: If you need reasonable accommodation to participate in this event, please contact the meeting organizer listed under Contact information. Please make your request no later than 1 week before the event.

nia.nih.gov

An official website of the National Institutes of Health