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News & Announcements


Frontotemporal lobar degeneration consortium combines and continues research efforts


Blood test method may predict amyloid deposits in brain, potentially indicating Alzheimer's disease


NIH-funded translational research centers to speed, diversify Alzheimer's drug discovery


Gene therapy shows promise repairing brain tissue damaged by stroke


Poor sleep in middle age linked to late-life Alzheimer's-related brain changes


New study points to targetable protective factor in Alzheimer's disease


Markers of abnormal liver function linked to Alzheimer's disease


Machine learning method enables quick analysis of amyloid plaques


New hippocampal neurons continue to form in older adults, including those with MCI, Alzheimer's


Intensive blood pressure control may slow age-related brain damage


NIH enables imaging in lifestyle interventions trial for Alzheimer’s disease


NIA Small Business funding seeks to find blood-based diagnostic for Alzheimer’s disease


NIH Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Dementias Professional Judgment Budget for FY 2021 now online


NIA program staff will answer questions at AAIC booth 705


Noninvasive brain wave treatment reduces Alzheimer's pathology, improves memory in mice


Gene expression signatures of Alzheimer's disease


Purging failed brain insulation cells lessened damage, improved cognition in Alzheimer's mouse model


Alzheimer's in extended family members increased risk of disease, study shows


Guidelines proposed for newly defined Alzheimer's-like brain disorder


Physical activity and motor ability associated with better cognition in older adults, even with dementia


Blood test shows promise in predicting presymptomatic disease progression in people at risk of familial Alzheimer's


Uterus plays a role in brain function, animal study shows


New report on emerging technologies to help older Americans maintain independence


Data sharing uncovers five new risk genes for Alzheimer's disease


Alzheimer's protein higher in women, may mean higher risk of symptoms