Research and Funding

Inside NIA: A Blog for Researchers

Posted on May 18, 2016 by Toccara Chamberlain, Program Analyst in the Office of Legislation, Policy, and International Activities.

You have a burning idea about aging. Now you need the funding for it. What do you do? Or, you once sent an application through the inscrutable machinery of grants.gov. You even retrieved reviews after an eternity of waiting. And now, apart from burying the reviews in several feet of dirt where they will be of most use, you have no idea what your next move is. We may have the answer for you. Read More

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Posted on May 11, 2016 by Marie A. Bernard, Deputy Director, National Institute on Aging.

California, here we come! No, we’re not participating in a gold rush, we’re going to the annual meeting of the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) next week in Long Beach. We’re looking forward to seeing old friends and making new ones. We also hope that you’ll take the opportunity to connect with NIA staff at the meeting, during scientific sessions and at the Exhibit Hall. Read More

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Posted on May 4, 2016 by Sergei Romashkan, Chief of the Clinical Trials Branch, Division of Geriatrics and Clinical Gerontology.

Large-scale clinical trials are expensive. They require a lot of time and money on the part of the investigators. So does preparing an NIH application for a clinical trial. One way you can save time and money at the beginning of the process is to submit a concept proposal for your trial to NIA’s Clinical Trials Advisory Panel (CTAP). Read More

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Posted on April 27, 2016 by Robin Barr, Director of the Division of Extramural Activities.

About half of the 22 NIH Institutes no longer post a funding line. Of course, we at NIA do so much better—we post multiple funding lines! We are transparent, though. I’ve heard it said around the halls of NIH that a funding line is a crutch for staff, an easy way to indicate to investigators that their application could not be paid. Read More

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Posted on April 20, 2016 by Robin Barr, Director of the Division of Extramural Activities.

It is April. Spring flowers, trees in bud, warming temperatures, and a funding update from NIA that is as natural as the Spring, and as welcome as the flowers? (OK. Not so much!) Still, it is good news for some. Read More

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Posted on April 13, 2016 by Chyren Hunter, Deputy Director and Training Officer, Division of Extramural Activities.

It’s spring! Here’s some exciting news that may help you get some spring fever! Effective with applications submitted on February, 12, 2016, and moving forward, NIH is allowing up to $100,000 plus fringe benefits toward an applicant’s salary to cover the percentage effort requested on NIH K08 and K23 awards. Current K awardees also benefit from these new guidelines. Read More

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Posted on April 6, 2016 by Creighton Phelps, Deputy Director, Division of Neuroscience.

Thousands of gene candidates in the human genome have the potential to play a role in the onset and progression of Alzheimer’s disease. But you are just one scientist. How can you even start such an enormous task? This quest—one scientist analyzing thousands of gene candidates—can seem overwhelming. I want to share with you two great NIA-funded resources that collect and store biological specimens and data—and are available to you and the wider research community. Read More

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Posted on March 30, 2016 by Cerise Elliott, Senior Research Program Analyst, Division of Neuroscience.

When I began graduate school in 1999, I knew right away that my experience would be different from that of my peers: I am a female scientist of color, and when I looked for others that looked like me, I saw only a few. Naturally, I wondered why this was the case and whether anything could be done to change the situation. While I understood the complexities of this issue, I believed that something could be done, and fortunately when I arrived at NIH, I found ready agreement among my colleagues. Read More

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Posted on March 23, 2016 by Robin Barr, Director of the Division of Extramural Activities.

Several recent commentaries (Danthi, Wu, Shi and Lauer; Lauer, Danthi, Kaltman, and Wu;) have found that the percentile rank an application receives in peer review has little or no noticeable relationship to how productive (in terms of citation impact of publications) a subsequent award is, should the application be so fortunate as to be awarded. So, a first-percentile application is apparently no more productive than a 15th-percentile application. Is that outcome really surprising? Read More

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Posted on March 16, 2016 by Richard Hodes, Director, National Institute on Aging.

At the National Institute on Aging, our shared vision is one in which all Americans enjoy robust health and independence with advancing age. Although we have come far in 40 years of supporting and  conducting research, we in the scientific community will need to think broadly, creatively, intelligently—and strategically—to pursue this goal most effectively. I am proud to let you know that an updated version of NIA’s Strategic Directions, Aging Well in the 21st Century, is now available. Read More

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