Research and Funding

Inside NIA: A Blog for Researchers

Posted on April 6, 2016 by Creighton Phelps, Deputy Director, Division of Neuroscience.

Thousands of gene candidates in the human genome have the potential to play a role in the onset and progression of Alzheimer’s disease. But you are just one scientist. How can you even start such an enormous task? This quest—one scientist analyzing thousands of gene candidates—can seem overwhelming. I want to share with you two great NIA-funded resources that collect and store biological specimens and data—and are available to you and the wider research community. Read More

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Posted on March 30, 2016 by Cerise Elliott, Senior Research Program Analyst, Division of Neuroscience.

When I began graduate school in 1999, I knew right away that my experience would be different from that of my peers: I am a female scientist of color, and when I looked for others that looked like me, I saw only a few. Naturally, I wondered why this was the case and whether anything could be done to change the situation. While I understood the complexities of this issue, I believed that something could be done, and fortunately when I arrived at NIH, I found ready agreement among my colleagues. Read More

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Posted on March 23, 2016 by Robin Barr, Director of the Division of Extramural Activities.

Several recent commentaries (Danthi, Wu, Shi and Lauer; Lauer, Danthi, Kaltman, and Wu;) have found that the percentile rank an application receives in peer review has little or no noticeable relationship to how productive (in terms of citation impact of publications) a subsequent award is, should the application be so fortunate as to be awarded. So, a first-percentile application is apparently no more productive than a 15th-percentile application. Is that outcome really surprising? Read More

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Posted on March 16, 2016 by Richard Hodes, Director, National Institute on Aging.

At the National Institute on Aging, our shared vision is one in which all Americans enjoy robust health and independence with advancing age. Although we have come far in 40 years of supporting and  conducting research, we in the scientific community will need to think broadly, creatively, intelligently—and strategically—to pursue this goal most effectively. I am proud to let you know that an updated version of NIA’s Strategic Directions, Aging Well in the 21st Century, is now available. Read More

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Posted on March 9, 2016 by Jonathan W. King, Program Director, Division of Behavioral and Social Research.

In 2009, NIH received its first year of funding through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). NIA received $275 million over two years in ARRA funds. Overall, these funds were used to intensify and expand scientific study and support the research infrastructure in aging and age-related cognitive change, including Alzheimer’s disease, through a series of grants and initiatives. Among the many important projects NIA supported using ARRA funds was the genotyping of DNA samples collected from almost 20,000 participants in the Health and Retirement Study (HRS). Read More

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Posted on March 2, 2016 by Laurie Ryan, Program Director, Alzheimer's Disease Clinical Trials, Division of Neuroscience.

Although Alzheimer’s is the most common cause of dementia in older adults, an estimated 20 to 40 percent of people with dementia have some other form—such as Lewy body, vascular or frontotemporal dementia. NIH is focused on advancing our understanding of these Alzheimer’s disease-related dementias (ADRD). I hope you will join us in this effort by attending—either in person or by webcast—the 2016 Alzheimer’s Disease-Related Dementias Summit. Read More

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Posted on February 24, 2016 by Carl V. Hill, Director, Office of Special Populations.

The Butler-Williams Scholars Program provides unique opportunities for junior faculty and researchers who are new to the field of aging to gain insight about research on aging from a number of perspectives. I invite you, if you are one of those researchers, to apply to the program. This year’s Butler-Williams Scholars Program takes place on July 25-29 on the NIH campus in Bethesda, MD. The application deadline is March 25. Read More

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Posted on February 17, 2016 by Mack Mackiewicz, Program Director, Division of Neuroscience.

If we hope to translate what we are learning about Alzheimer’s disease into health, safety, and emotional well-being benefits for Alzheimer’s patients and their families, then small businesses have a vital role in making that happen. The NIA recently published two funding opportunity announcements for small businesses focused on Alzheimer’s disease. One targets the Small Business Innovative Research program and the other the Small Business Technology Transfer program. Both have an initial submission date approaching rapidly—April 5. And if peer reviewers smile upon your application, you can even receive funding before the end of September this year. Read More

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Posted on February 10, 2016 by Michele Evans, Chief, Health Disparities Research Section, Laboratory of Epidemiology and Population Sciences.

Each summer, NIA’s Intramural Research Program opens its lab doors to students for an 8- to 10-week intensive research experience. The Summer Training in Aging Research (STAR) Program is an opportunity for bright and motivated students to move beyond replicating standard protocols in school labs. It’s much more than just pouring gels and inputting data; it’s an unparalleled experience that can change or solidify your career trajectory. I invite you to join us. Read More

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Posted on February 3, 2016 by Robin Barr, Director of the Division of Extramural Activities.

As the funding policy statement makes clear, the fiscal year 2016 budget is a historic first for NIA. Yes, we received a very substantial increase for research related to Alzheimer’s disease—$350 million. But, in addition to that, we received a 4.2-percent increase in our general budget. That amount is above the rate of inflation for the first time since 2003, at the end of the era of doubling the budget. But, the competition for new and renewing awards remains fierce. Read More

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