Research and Funding

Inside NIA: A Blog for Researchers

Go4Life® is NIA’s national exercise and physical activity campaign for people 50+ which seeks to empower older adults to become more physically active. In September 2015, we celebrate our first-ever Go4Life Month, in collaboration with the White House Conference on Aging, working with our Go4Life partners across the country to conduct events and attract further attention to the campaign. But, Go4Life has much yet to do—and we need your help. Read More

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Posted on August 19, 2015 by Carl V. Hill, Director, Office of Special Populations.

On July 8, 2015, NIA’s Office of Special Populations released PA-15-293, “Aging Research to Address Health Disparities.“ It seeks to support aging research that addresses disparities in health, including preclinical, clinical, social, and behavioral studies. A few weeks ago, I sat down with Dr. Felipe Sierra, director of the Division of Aging Biology (DAB) to discuss some opportunities for involving basic researchers in health disparities research. Read More

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Posted on August 5, 2015 by Richard Hodes, Director, National Institute on Aging.

Just last week, I had the honor of presenting, on behalf of NIH Director Dr. Francis Collins, the first-ever NIH Professional Judgment Budget for Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias. Outlined at the July 27 meeting of the HHS Secretary’s Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care, and Services, the proposal—commonly referred to as a Bypass Budget—lays out NIH’s plan to speed discovery into these devastating disorders, aimed at meeting the research goal of the National Plan to Address Alzheimer’s Disease—to prevent and effectively treat Alzheimer’s disease by 2025. Read More

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Posted on July 22, 2015 by Carl V. Hill, Director, Office of Special Populations.

This year’s Butler-Williams Scholars Program will take place next week on the NIH campus. Recently, NIA Director Dr. Richard Hodes described to the Friends of the NIA why it’s so important to encourage new and early-stage investigators’ interests in aging research and explained some of the opportunities that we are providing new investigators. Read More

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Posted on July 8, 2015 by Robin Barr, Director of the Division of Extramural Activities.

We will be posting a new pay line for Alzheimer’s research, and I want to alert you to two important facts around it. Read More

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Posted on June 24, 2015 by Nina Silverberg, Assistant Director, Alzheimer’s Disease Centers Program, Division of Neuroscience.

If you’re struggling to recruit enough participants for your study, you are not alone. When time, staff, and other recruitment resources are limited, this can be a tough problem. How can you get a diverse group of study participants through your doors? One answer is likely right in your own backyard: connecting with local organizations who are already working with older adults in racially and economically diverse communities. Volunteers may spread information about your study on your behalf. Get involved and explain what you are doing and why. Then ask for their help. Read More

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NIA is supporting a unique new website—the Gateway to Global Aging Data—that enables cross-national comparisons of the health, social, and economic status of older people. If you haven’t looked at what’s available, or you haven’t looked recently, I encourage you to check it out. Do you need to know if people in Estonia smoke more than people in Germany? What might be behind why people in Japan live longer than people in other developed countries? The Gateway makes it easy to create interactive graphs and tables to immediately examine population estimates of various countries over time. You can generate graphs and tables to compare the same measures between sub-populations within a country or quickly identify cross-country differences, as well as changes over time. Read More

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I am a Scientific Review Officer (SRO) and currently lead the NIA-N Review committee. I’m constantly recruiting grant application reviewers: I mean, All The Time! During the course of each year, I also run a multitude of meetings to review grants responding to Requests for Applications, Program Project Grants (PPG), and Institutional/Individual Training Grant opportunities. It’s a good thing that I don’t take rejection personally, because more than half of the reviewers I try to recruit say, “NO,” and about a quarter of them just don’t answer my emails. One time I asked 89 people to review a PPG and only 14 of them said yes. Read More

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Posted on May 27, 2015 by Dallas Anderson, Program Administrator, Dementias of Aging Branch, Division of Neuroscience.

For scientists writing NIH grant applications, the aims are THE THING. The applicant calls the program officer: “What do you think of these aims?” The program officer listens and senses the enthusiasm. Later, however, when the aims get stated in the language of the grant application, the enthusiasm has been drained away, and the importance of the aims has been obscured by a wordy style of writing and a lack of focus. The program officer tries to be helpful by suggesting that it is important to make the reviewers enthusiastic about the proposed work. “But I am a scientist, not a salesman!” The applicant is in disbelief. Read More

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Posted on May 20, 2015 by Patrick Shirdon, Director of Management, National Institute on Aging.

Every NIH institute has an executive responsible for managing its business organization. This is someone who keeps computer systems, buildings, human resources, contracts, and budget operations running, someone who makes or administers policies. If I was on your campus, I might be called the Chief Business Officer. Read More

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Posted on May 13, 2015 by Basil Eldadah, Chief of the Geriatrics Branch, Division of Geriatrics and Clinical Gerontology.

Pepper Centers—a chain of spice shops?! Maybe. But at NIA, when we talk about Pepper Centers, we mean our prized centers of excellence in geriatrics research. They support biomedical research leading to maintenance of functional independence into older age. How could the Pepper Centers be important to you? I encourage you to look at joint and multidisciplinary projects that can enhance the already-excellent work that many Centers have undertaken. And, to look to them as a data resource for your studies in aging. The map on the Coordinating Center’s website provides links to each Center’s website, where you can find out more about their resources and people. Read More

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