Research and Funding

Inside NIA: A Blog for Researchers

Posted on February 17, 2016 by Mack Mackiewicz, Program Director, Division of Neuroscience.

If we hope to translate what we are learning about Alzheimer’s disease into health, safety, and emotional well-being benefits for Alzheimer’s patients and their families, then small businesses have a vital role in making that happen. The NIA recently published two funding opportunity announcements for small businesses focused on Alzheimer’s disease. One targets the Small Business Innovative Research program and the other the Small Business Technology Transfer program. Both have an initial submission date approaching rapidly—April 5. And if peer reviewers smile upon your application, you can even receive funding before the end of September this year. Read More

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Posted on February 10, 2016 by Michele Evans, Chief, Health Disparities Research Section, Laboratory of Epidemiology and Population Sciences.

Each summer, NIA’s Intramural Research Program opens its lab doors to students for an 8- to 10-week intensive research experience. The Summer Training in Aging Research (STAR) Program is an opportunity for bright and motivated students to move beyond replicating standard protocols in school labs. It’s much more than just pouring gels and inputting data; it’s an unparalleled experience that can change or solidify your career trajectory. I invite you to join us. Read More

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Posted on February 3, 2016 by Robin Barr, Director of the Division of Extramural Activities.

As the funding policy statement makes clear, the fiscal year 2016 budget is a historic first for NIA. Yes, we received a very substantial increase for research related to Alzheimer’s disease—$350 million. But, in addition to that, we received a 4.2-percent increase in our general budget. That amount is above the rate of inflation for the first time since 2003, at the end of the era of doubling the budget. But, the competition for new and renewing awards remains fierce. Read More

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Posted on January 27, 2016 by NIA Blog Team, Division of Extramural Activities.

The big news of 2016 so far is the increase in the NIA budget. We’re very excited about the many opportunities in aging research that will be possible because of these extra funds. As we flesh out new funding opportunities and wait for applications in response to existing announcements, we thought we would reprise a few interesting posts from the last few months in case you missed them. If you missed a few, now is your chance to catch up. Read More

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Posted on January 20, 2016 by Felipe Sierra, Director, Division of Aging Biology.

I’m very pleased to announce that the Trans-NIH GeroScience Interest Group (GSIG) and partners will host its second summit in 2016. The “Disease Drivers of Aging: 2016 Advances in Geroscience Summit” will take place on April 13–14 at the New York Academy of Sciences in New York City. Members of the Geroscience Interest Group from the NIH, with essential collaboration and support from the New York Academy of Sciences, the American Federation for Aging Research, and the Gerontological Society of America, have developed a theme and program for a second geroscience summit requested by the research community. Read More

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Posted on January 13, 2016 by Robin Barr, Director of the Division of Extramural Activities.

Next week, NIA’s National Advisory Council on Aging (NACA) will hold its first meeting of 2016. The January 20 public session promises to be particularly interesting. NIA Director Dr. Richard Hodes will provide some general background information on the FY 2016 budget for NIH and NIA. The session will also include NIH updates on research policy, as well as new scientific findings. Read More

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Posted on January 6, 2016 by Richard Hodes, Director, National Institute on Aging.

As we begin the new calendar year, I am happy to discuss exciting news about the NIH and NIA budgets for fiscal year 2016. As many of you probably know by now, on December 18, President Obama signed into law the FY2016 Omnibus Bill, which gave NIH an overall increase of $2 billion, or about 6.6 percent, above the FY2015 appropriation level. Importantly for NIA, this included an increase of approximately 33 percent over our FY2015 budget, which in large measure reflects some $350 million specifically directed to research into Alzheimer’s disease. Read More

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Posted on December 16, 2015 by John Williams, Health Scientist Administrator, Division of Aging Biology.

We all know that exercise and physical activity is good for us. Regular physical activity helps just about everything. But exactly how does exercise result in so many benefits? The answers may be found at the molecular level. Read More

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Posted on December 9, 2015 by Robin Barr, Director of the Division of Extramural Activities.

Those of you who read part 1 of this post a couple of weeks ago will remember that I raised a question at the end of that post: Could a policy affecting all investigators (the NIH policy change to allow a single amended submission) have a singular effect on a sub-group of investigators—early-stage and other inexperienced researchers? This week, we have the answer! Read More

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Posted on December 2, 2015 by Nalini Raghavachari, Health Scientist Administrator, Division of Geriatrics and Clinical Gerontology.

NIA’s Division of Geriatrics and Clinical Gerontology has developed a research program on the translation of genetic factors associated with longevity, giving us the chance to find new therapeutic targets to promote healthy aging. Translational genomics offers opportunities to identify new targets based on knowledge of the functional pathways of the gene variants associated with longevity. Read More

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