Research and Funding

Inside NIA: A Blog for Researchers

Posted on March 29, 2017 by Kimberly Kramer, NIH Guide Liaison, Division of Extramural Affairs.

As readers of this blog surely know, NIA publishes Funding Opportunity Announcements (FOAs) in the NIH Guide to—you guessed it—announce new opportunities to apply for funding. We use FOAs to inform potential applicants of new initiatives ranging from traditional R01 research grants to large P50 center grants and national surveys. But have you stopped to think about where an FOA originates? Read on for a behind-the-scenes look at FOA development. Read More

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Posted on March 22, 2017 by Robin Barr, Director of the Division of Extramural Activities.

A recurring question from readers after I post a new funding line blog post is: Does that line apply to my application? It usually does, bringing good news to those blessed with applications within that line. The normal caution applies—the line means that we expect to pay awards. Still, the funding line doesn’t apply to everything. Read More

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Posted on March 15, 2017 by Richard Hodes, Director, National Institute on Aging.

In mid-January, I attended the World Economic Forum annual meeting in Davos, Switzerland. This unique event—popularly referred to simply as Davos—connects international leaders in the private and public sectors—from government, business, and academia—to improve the global community. While “economics” is part of the meeting’s name, health, science, and technology were integral to the discussions. Read More

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Posted on March 8, 2017 by Samir Sauma, Director of the Office of Planning, Analysis, and Evaluation.

Research on Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias (AD/ADRD) is an important component of the NIA’s mission. In recent years, Congress has provided a significant amount of additional funding beyond our typical appropriation for us to accelerate research on the basic biology, prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and care related to this devastating group of diseases. With this additional funding comes the responsibility to plan and set priorities for the funds’ use. Read More

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Posted on March 1, 2017 by Carl V. Hill, Director, Office of Special Populations.

Are you a post-doc looking for training in aging research? Are you an established researcher who’s new to the area of aging research? Are you junior faculty interested in expanding your career options? If you answered “yes” to any of these questions, then you should apply for the 2017 NIA Butler-Williams Scholars Program. Read More

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Posted on February 22, 2017 by John Haaga, Deputy Director, Division of Behavioral and Social Research.

Though research on age differences has its place, almost by definition, research on aging involves tracking people over time periods long enough to observe long-term changes in their lives and health. And, accurate measurements of large samples can be an expensive undertaking. The NIA has made major investments to create and maintain data resources that can be used for dozens—and in some cases, hundreds—of analyses, using the tools of the behavioral and social sciences. Read More

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Posted on February 15, 2017 by Lis Nielsen, Chief, Individual Behavioral Processes Branch, Division of Behavioral and Social Research.

Flip a coin? Roll the dice? Consult an expert? How do you decide? What happens as we age that may either compromise or strengthen our decision-making capacities? To appreciate how aging affects our ability to make decisions, we need to first understand age-related changes in basic psychological processes involved, including social, cognitive and emotional motivations for decisions. Research providing that knowledge can help us build better interventions to support decision making by older adults including decisions that affect their health. Read More

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Posted on February 8, 2017 by Robin Barr, Director of the Division of Extramural Activities.

The entire U.S. government, including NIA, is currently operating under an extension of a continuing resolution (CR) that will end on April 28…unless it is extended again, that is. A continuing resolution extends the previous year’s appropriations act, and the appropriations language within it, into the next fiscal year. It is usually minimally altered from the terms in the prior year. In other words, at this point in FY 2017, we’re operating with virtually the same budget we had in FY 2016. Read More

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Posted on February 1, 2017 by Lorenzo Refolo, Program Director, Division of Neuroscience.

Alzheimer’s drug discovery and development is not for the fainthearted. It’s extremely expensive and time-consuming, and the possibility of disappointment looms at every phase of discovery. According to one analysis, half of candidate therapies fail during preclinical research—the phase when important information on feasibility, testing, and drug safety is collected. And, if a promising therapy does advance to a clinical trial, another recent analysis indicates there’s a 98 percent failure rate during phase II and III, primarily due to lack of efficacy. Read More

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Posted on January 25, 2017 by Marie A. Bernard, Deputy Director, National Institute on Aging.

Researchers often complain to us that new funding opportunity announcements (FOAs) scoot past them, lost in the blizzard of information that arrives daily. Unless you obsessively monitor the NIH Guide—which we’re not necessarily recommending—you may not see every new announcement that NIA publishes. And, unless you have a well-thought-out research proposal outlined and ready to commit to paper, it sometimes can be difficult to pull together a grant application in the time allowed. Read More

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Posted on January 18, 2017 by Robin Barr, Director of the Division of Extramural Activities.

Small smiles of satisfaction spread around the staff in my office last week. The NIH Guide published the last of our long-running saga of funding opportunity announcements (FOAs) on Alzheimer’s disease and Alzheimer’s-related dementias (ADRD). These were the concepts that the National Advisory Council on Aging approved last September (Thank you again, everyone!). Read More

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