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Four Things To Know About Depression and Older Adults

Depression is more than just feeling sad or blue. It’s a serious mood disorder that affects many older adults and requires treatment. Learn more about depression and when it may be time to talk with a doctor.

Share this infographic to help spread the word about depression and older adults. Click on the social media icons on this page, or copy and paste the URL and post it to your account (Twitter, Facebook, etc.).

The Four Things To Know About Depression infographic. Full transcript below

Get Immediate Help

If you are thinking about harming yourself, tell someone who can help immediately.

  • Do not isolate yourself.
  • Call a trusted family member or friend.
  • Call 911 or go to a hospital emergency room to get immediate help.
  • Make an appointment with your doctor.

Call the 24-hour National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 800-273-TALK (800-273-8255) or 800-799-4TTY (800-799-4889).

Share on Social Media

Copy and paste these messages into social media to help spread the word about depression and older adults:

  • Read and share this infographic from the National Institute on Aging and learn more about depression and older adults. https://go.usa.gov/xzFQM
  • Depression is more than just feeling sad or blue. Explore four things you should know about depression and older adults. https://go.usa.gov/xzFQJ
  • Concerned about depression in older adults? Read and share this infographic about four things you should know. https://go.usa.gov/xzFU4

Transcript

4 Things To Know About Depression and Older Adults

Everyone has feelings of uneasiness, stress, and sadness at some point during their life.

However, clinical depression is more than just feeling sad or blue. It’s a serious condition that affects many older adults and requires treatment.

Signs and symptoms of depression vary from person to person. Look for changes in your mood or your interest in participating in activities.

Depression can be treated. If you have symptoms of depression that last for more than two weeks, talk with your doctor. There are many effective treatment options, so it’s important to seek help early on.

Get support from family and friends. Though they cannot provide treatment, loved ones can help someone with depression by listening, watching for symptoms, participating in activities the person enjoys, and encouraging them to seek treatment.

A healthy lifestyle can help feelings of depression. Staying active, eating a healthy diet, getting enough sleep, and connecting with friends and family can benefit your mental health.

Learn more about depression and older adults.