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Healthy Eating

Getting Enough Fluids

It’s important for your body to have plenty of fluids each day. Water helps you digest your food, absorb nutrients from food, and then get rid of the unused waste. Water is found in foods—both solids and liquids, as well as in its natural state.

Grandmother drinking water with her grandsonWith age, you might lose some of your sense of thirst. To further complicate matters, some medicines might make it even more important to have plenty of fluids.

Remember, water is a good way to add fluids to your daily routine without adding calories.

Try these tips for getting enough fluids:

  • Don’t wait until you feel thirsty to drink water or other fluids.
  • Take sips of water, milk, or juice between bites during meals.
  • Add liquids throughout the day.
  • Have a cup of low-fat soup as an afternoon snack.
  • Drink a full glass of water when you take a pill.
  • Have a glass of water before you exercise.
  • Drink fat-free or low-fat milk, or other drinks without added sugars.
  • If you drink alcoholic beverages, do so sensibly and in moderation. That means up to one drink per day for women and up to two drinks for men.
  • Don’t stop drinking liquids if you have a urinary control problem. Talk with your doctor about treatment.

Learn how to shift to healthier beverage choices.

Read about this topic in Spanish. Lea sobre este tema en español.

For More Information on Fluids and Nutrition

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)
1-800-860-8747 (toll-free)
1-866-569-1162 (TTY/toll-free)
healthinfo@niddk.nih.gov
www.niddk.nih.gov

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute
(Instituto Nacional del Corazón, los Pulmones y la Sangre)

1-301-592-8573
nhlbiinfo@nhlbi.nih.gov
www.nhlbi.nih.gov

National Association of Nutrition and Aging Services Programs
1-202-682-6899
www.nanasp.org

President’s Council on Fitness, Sports, and Nutrition
1-240-276-9567
fitness@hhs.gov
www.fitness.gov