Health care costs for dementia found greater than for any other disease

In the last five years of life, total health care spending for people with dementia was more than a quarter-million dollars per person, some 57 percent greater than costs associated with death from other diseases, including cancer and heart disease. The new analysis, appearing in the Oct. 27, 2015, online issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine, estimates that total health care spending was $287,000 for those with probable dementia and $183,000 for other Medicare beneficiaries in the study.

2015 Alzheimer's & Related Dementias Webinar Series for Professionals

Get up to speed on the latest in Alzheimer’s and dementia.

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community members, people with dementia, and family caregivers.

Mixed pathologies likely cause dementia in the oldest-old

The brains of people who live to age 90 and older—the oldest-old—usually have a mix of pathologies associated with dementia. Alzheimer’s disease-related brain changes are the most common, but other pathologies often found at autopsy include infarcts, Lewy bodies, hippocampal sclerosis, and white-matter disease. For the first time, researchers examined the relationship between the number of pathologies found at autopsy and the severity of dementia in the oldest-old.

Read latest Connections newsletter for Alzheimer’s research news

The Spring 2015 issue of Connections, the e-newsletter from NIA’s Alzheimer’s Disease Education and Referral (ADEAR) Center, is now available!

In the latest issue:

Find information about volunteering for Alzheimer's clinical trials and studies

Researchers are making great advances in identifying potential new ways to help diagnose, treat, and even prevent Alzheimer’s disease. But it will take many people, including older adults, volunteering for research studies and trials to help find the answers. Find out what you can do. Visit our new webpage—Volunteer for Alzheimer’s Research—to:

Physical activity associated with fewer aging brain-related movement problems

Age-related brain lesions known as white matter hyperintensities (WMH) have been linked to movement problems and disabilities in late life. A recent study suggests that physically active older people may have fewer movement problems caused by WMH. The study, supported in part by NIA, was published online March 11, 2015, in Neurology.

Alzheimer’s research news featured in fall 2014 Connections

The Fall 2014 issue of Connections, the e-newsletter from NIA’s Alzheimer’s Disease Education and Referral (ADEAR) Center, is now available!

In the latest issue:

Increased brain activity may compensate for amyloid pathology in older brains

Researchers have long wondered why some older people remain cognitively normal despite having abnormal levels of beta-amyloid in their brains, a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease. While research has shown that older adults with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), which often leads to Alzheimer’s, frequently have increased activity in the hippocampus compared to their cognitively healthy peers, scientists questioned what the hyperactivity represented. Was it helping to compensate for declining brain function or signaling onset of the disease?


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