Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center

Research

HHS takes steps to provide more information about clinical trials to the public

On Sept. 16, 2016, in an effort to make information about clinical trials widely available to the public, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) issued a final rule specifying requirements for registering and reporting summary results information to ClinicalTrials.gov. The new rule expands the legal requirements for submitting registration and results information for certain clinical trials involving U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-regulated drug, biological and device products to ClinicalTrials.gov.

NIA boosts Alzheimer’s research network with two new centers

The National Institute on Aging (NIA) at NIH is pleased to announce two new additions to its Alzheimer’s Disease Centers Program—a network of researchers and clinicians developing and sharing new approaches and findings to speed discovery in dementia research.

People at genetic risk for Alzheimer’s disease to test prevention drugs

An NIH-supported study will test 2 drugs to prevent or delay Alzheimer’s in people at genetic risk. Read about the latest dementia prevention study.

Brain scans offer insights into loss of money skills

MRI scans show brain changes related to money management skills in older adults. Can researchers identify seniors at risk of losing financial capacity?

Does poor sleep raise risk for Alzheimer’s disease?

Are sleep disorders like sleep apnea a risk for Alzheimer’s and cognitive impairment? Research into the connection shows what happens in the brain and more.

SIRT3 enzyme protects brain cells from stress, helped by exercise

As animals, including humans, age or develop brain diseases such as Alzheimer’s, their brain cells may not produce enough energy to remain fully functional. A new study shows that an enzyme, SIRT3, may protect brain cells against stresses believed to contribute to energy loss. Researchers also found that physical exercise increases the expression of SIRT3, helping to protect the brain against degeneration. The results were published online Nov. 19, 2015, in Cell Metabolism.

Health care costs for dementia found greater than for any other disease

In the last five years of life, total health care spending for people with dementia was more than a quarter-million dollars per person, some 57 percent greater than costs associated with death from other diseases, including cancer and heart disease. The new analysis, appearing in the Oct. 27, 2015, online issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine, estimates that total health care spending was $287,000 for those with probable dementia and $183,000 for other Medicare beneficiaries in the study.

2015 Alzheimer's & Related Dementias Webinar Series for Professionals

Get up to speed on the latest in Alzheimer’s and dementia.

Learn what you need to know to inform, educate, and empower
community members, people with dementia, and family caregivers.

Mixed pathologies likely cause dementia in the oldest-old

The brains of people who live to age 90 and older—the oldest-old—usually have a mix of pathologies associated with dementia. Alzheimer’s disease-related brain changes are the most common, but other pathologies often found at autopsy include infarcts, Lewy bodies, hippocampal sclerosis, and white-matter disease. For the first time, researchers examined the relationship between the number of pathologies found at autopsy and the severity of dementia in the oldest-old.

Read latest Connections newsletter for Alzheimer’s research news

The Spring 2015 issue of Connections, the e-newsletter from NIA’s Alzheimer’s Disease Education and Referral (ADEAR) Center, is now available!

In the latest issue:

Subscribe to RSS - Research