Health and Aging

Alzheimer's Disease

People at genetic risk for Alzheimer’s disease to test prevention drugs

An NIH-supported study will test 2 drugs to prevent or delay Alzheimer’s in people at genetic risk. Read about the latest dementia prevention study.

Brain scans offer insights into loss of money skills

MRI scans show brain changes related to money management skills in older adults. Can researchers identify seniors at risk of losing financial capacity?

Decoding the molecular ties between vascular disease and Alzheimer's

Seeking a better understanding of vascular contributions to Alzheimer's disease, the National Institutes of Health has launched the Molecular Mechanisms of the Vascular Etiology of Alzheimer's Disease (M²OVE-AD) Consortium, a team-science venture to build a nuanced model of Alzheimer's disease that more accurately reflects its many causes and pathways.

Does poor sleep raise risk for Alzheimer’s disease?

Are sleep disorders like sleep apnea a risk for Alzheimer’s and cognitive impairment? Research into the connection shows what happens in the brain and more.

SIRT3 enzyme protects brain cells from stress, helped by exercise

As animals, including humans, age or develop brain diseases such as Alzheimer’s, their brain cells may not produce enough energy to remain fully functional. A new study shows that an enzyme, SIRT3, may protect brain cells against stresses believed to contribute to energy loss. Researchers also found that physical exercise increases the expression of SIRT3, helping to protect the brain against degeneration. The results were published online Nov. 19, 2015, in Cell Metabolism.

NIH supports new studies to find Alzheimer’s biomarkers in Down syndrome

The National Institutes of Health has launched a new initiative to identify biomarkers and track the progression of Alzheimer’s in people with Down syndrome. Many people with Down syndrome have Alzheimer’s-related brain changes in their 30s that can lead to dementia in their 50s and 60s. Little is known about how the disease progresses in this vulnerable group.

Health care costs for dementia found greater than for any other disease

In the last five years of life, total health care spending for people with dementia was more than a quarter-million dollars per person, some 57 percent greater than costs associated with death from other diseases, including cancer and heart disease. The new analysis, appearing in the Oct. 27, 2015, online issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine, estimates that total health care spending was $287,000 for those with probable dementia and $183,000 for other Medicare beneficiaries in the study.

Mixed pathologies likely cause dementia in the oldest-old

The brains of people who live to age 90 and older—the oldest-old—usually have a mix of pathologies associated with dementia. Alzheimer’s disease-related brain changes are the most common, but other pathologies often found at autopsy include infarcts, Lewy bodies, hippocampal sclerosis, and white-matter disease. For the first time, researchers examined the relationship between the number of pathologies found at autopsy and the severity of dementia in the oldest-old.

NIH summit delivers recommendations to transform Alzheimer’s disease research

The National Institutes of Health released recommendations today that provide a framework for a bold and transformative Alzheimer’s disease research agenda.

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