Announcements

  • January 14, 2015

    Historian Gabrielle Tayac, Ph.D., spoke at a Native American Heritage Month Celebration Nov. 12 2014 at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland.

    The talk was part of the “Healing Our Community Through Narrative: The Power of Storytelling” series organized and hosted by the NIH Office of Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion, in partnership with the Trans-NIH American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN)  Health Communications and Information Workgroup, the Trans-NIH AI/AN Research Interest Workgroup and the NIA Office of Special Populations.

    Read more at: http://www.niehs.nih.gov/news/newsletter/2014/12/spotlight-nihprogram/index.htm

  • January 13, 2015

    NIA and NASA have funded an experiment on T cell activation in microgravity. This experiment has successfully reached the International Space Station (ISS) on 1/12/2015 aboard the SpaceX5 Falcon. Dr. Millie Hughes-Fulford is conducting experiments on the effects of microgravity on immune system function and comparing these effects to those observed for aging individuals. Here is the YouTube video that CASIS has placed on the NASA website:

  • January 14, 2015

    Cartoon of four people in conversation.

    "NIA funding announcements come with an expiration date," writes Dr. John Haaga in a new blog post. Dr. Haaga, deputy director of the NIA Division of Behavioral and Social Research, explains what happens when a Program Announcement expires, covering questions such as:

    • Is the NIA still funding research on the topic?
    • Is there money for research on this topic in the future?
    • What in the world is a Program Announcement and how do those applications get reviewed and funded?

    Read the full blog post: What does it mean when a Program Announcement expires?

    The NIA blog publishes weekly with information on grants and funding policy, research priorities, scientific meetings, and topics of interest to researchers and others in the scientific community. Subscribe to get it weekly in your email inbox, or grab the RSS feed.

  • January 7, 2015

    Cartoon of four people in conversation.

    In a new blog post, Dr. Carl V. Hill, director of the NIA Office of Special Populations, describes new activities that help foster diversity in the research workforce. "This funding can help us reach goals of increasing racial diversity in the biomedical scientific community," Dr. Hill explains. "And, there may be a chance to increase the number and variety of scientists who are trained and mentored to conduct much-needed, multidisciplinary health disparities research!"

    Read the full blog post: Diversity training and health disparities research at the NIA

    The NIA blog publishes weekly with information on grants and funding policy, research priorities, scientific meetings, and topics of interest to researchers and others in the scientific community. Subscribe to get it weekly in your email inbox, or grab the RSS feed.

  • December 18, 2014

    Cartoon of four people in conversation.

    Dr. Creighton Phelps, Deputy Director of the Division of Neuroscience, has a new blog post about the NIA-funded National Cell Repository for Alzheimer’s Disease, or NCRAD. "Identifying the genes involved in Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias is, of course, no easy task," Dr. Phelps writes. "From among the thousands of gene candidates in the human genome, we need to determine which are involved in onset and progression, and which increase risk or offer protection. Where can researchers find the biological specimens needed to unlock these mysteries?"

    Read the full blog post: NCRAD offers genetic samples and data vital to Alzheimer’s research

    The NIA blog publishes weekly with information on grants and funding policy, research priorities, scientific meetings, and topics of interest to researchers and others in the scientific community. Subscribe to get it weekly in your email inbox, or grab the RSS feed.

  • December 15, 2014

    Dr. Gammatikakis in a white lab coat, with laboratory equipment visible behind.Dr. Yannis Grammatikakis is a postdoctoral fellow in the RNA Regulation Section of the National Institute on Aging Intramural Research Program. In a new post for the NIH i am intramural blog, he discusses non-coding ribonucleic acid, or RNA, and its role in gene expression and the basic biology of aging. Dr. Grammatikakis explains his long-standing interest in RNA, "It is such a flexible and diverse molecule, but also largely unexplored."

    Read the full blog post: Non-Coding RNAs Are Rising Stars in Gene Expression Regulation

  • December 11, 2014

    Cartoon of four people in conversation.

    The NIA has long been interested in understanding the role of aging on the development and progression of specific chronic diseases. More recently, we’ve begun to try to understand why two or more conditions might occur together in older people, and perhaps more importantly, what to do about it. A recent post by Dr. Marcel Salive, Program Officer of the Division of Geriatrics and Clinical Gerontology, discusses NIA’s new program announcements on self-management of chronic conditions, seeking applications using R01, R15, or R21 mechanisms.

    Read the full blog post:  When is one not enough? Multiple chronic conditions research

    The NIA blog publishes weekly with information on grants and funding policy, research priorities, scientific meetings, and topics of interest to researchers and others in the scientific community. Subscribe to get it weekly in your email inbox, or grab the RSS feed.

  • December 10, 2014

    Almost 16 million Americans aged 65 and older report having at least one disability, according to a new report by the U.S. Census Bureau (PDF, 1.5M), commissioned and funded by the NIA. This is the first Census report on disabilities among older people and looks at disability status by age, sex, marital status, education, and poverty status.

    The report is based on data from the American Community Survey (ACS) and covers six types of disability, including difficulty in hearing, vision, cognition, walking, self-care, and independent living. People who reported any one of the six disability types are considered to have a disability. The most common type of disability was difficulty in walking or climbing stairs, which was reported by two-thirds of those with a disability.

    The report includes information on the geographic distribution of older people with a disability, with data shown at the county level. The prevalence of disability at older ages varies widely across counties; the Appalachian region, the lower Mississippi Valley, and parts of the upper South have particularly high rates. The report includes a number of maps, including one showing the percentage of older people living alone in poverty with a disability.

    The oldest old—those aged 85 and older—had the highest prevalence of disability. While this group represented 13.6 percent of the total older population, they accounted for 25.4 percent of those with a disability.

    Reference: He, Wan and Luke J. Larsen, U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey Reports, ACS-29, Older Americans With a Disability: 2008 – 2012, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, DC, 2014.

  • December 3, 2014

    Cartoon of four people in conversation.

    The NIA has announced interim paylines for fiscal year 2015. Grant applicants and the research community are often very interested in these paylines and funding policies. At this time, the NIA is funding to the 5th percentile for research grants, and to a score of 14 on career awards and only paying NIA-reviewed applications that achieved scores of 10 or 11. In a post for NIA’s blog, Dr. Robin Barr, director of the Division of Extramural Activities, goes into depth, focusing on how NIA is managing paylines in light of recent policy changes.

    Read the full blog post: Interim paylines

    The NIA blog publishes weekly with information on grants and funding policy, research priorities, scientific meetings, and topics of interest to researchers and others in the scientific community. Subscribe to get it weekly in your email inbox, or grab the RSS feed.

  • November 19, 2014

    Today, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) issued a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM), which proposes regulations to implement reporting requirements for clinical trials that are subject to Title VIII of the Food and Drug Administration Amendments Act of 2007 (FDAAA). The proposed rule clarifies requirements to clinical researchers for registering clinical trials and submitting summary trial results information to ClinicalTrials.gov, a publicly accessible database operated by the National Library of Medicine, part of the National Institutes of Health. A major change from current requirements that is proposed in the NPRM is the expansion of the scope of clinical trials required to submit summary results to include trials of unapproved, unlicensed, and uncleared products.

    In addition, NIH proposed a policy to promote transparency for all NIH-funded clinical trials, whether or not they are subject to FDAAA. The proposed policy expects registration and submission of results information like that required by FDAAA in ClinicalTrials.gov of every clinical trial that receives NIH dollars.

    Read the news release along with the NPRM and NIH proposed policy changes. HHS and NIH encourage public feedback during the 90-day comment period.

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