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Transcranial Alternating Current Stimulation for Modulation of Sleep and Cognitive Performance

Recruiting

This study will investigate the effect of transcranial alternating current stimulation on sleep and cognitive performance in cognitively normal older adults and in individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI).

Minimum Age Maximum Age Gender Healthy Volunteers
18 Years 80 Years All Yes
March 7, 2018
December 2020
145

  • Diagnosis of amnestic MCI or cognitively normal
  • Native English speaker

  • Brain tumors or skull defects
  • Epilepsy
  • Metal implants or devices above the neck
  • Eczema or sensitive skin
  • Insomnia, sleep apnea, narcolepsy, or rapid eye movement-sleep behavior disorder
  • Restless legs syndrome
  • Currently pregnant or trying to become pregnant

Transcranial alternating current stimulation uses electrodes to deliver small amounts of electricity through the brain. In this study, researchers will investigate the effect of stimulation on sleep, thinking and memory, mood, and quality of life. Participants will undergo either transcranial alternating current stimulation or sham stimulation during slow-wave sleep.

Loss of slow-wave sleep is common in people with MCI and Alzheimers disease and is thought to worsen thinking, memory, and brain degeneration. Transcranial alternating current stimulation has been demonstrated to enhance slow-wave sleep and improve memory in healthy adults. This research will investigate the effect of the stimulation on both cognitively normal older adults and those with MCI.

Name City State Zip Status Primary Contact
University of Colorado AMC
Aurora Colorado 80045 Recruiting

University of Colorado, Denver

Name Role Affiliation
Brice McConnell, MD Principal Investigator University of Colorado, Denver

Name Phone Email
Nicola Haakonsen 303-724-4644 nicola.haakonsen@ucdenver.edu

NCT03112902

Application of Transcranial Alternating Current Stimulation for Modulation of Sleep and Cognitive Performance