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Promoting Adaptive Neuroplasticity in Mild Cognitive Impairment

Recruiting

People with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) have memory deficits but remain relatively independent in everyday life. This study will determine if noninvasive brain stimulation can enhance functioning in specific brain regions and networks, increasing participants' ability to benefit from memory rehabilitation.

Minimum Age Maximum Age Gender Healthy Volunteers
50 Years 88 Years Both No
December 2014
December 31, 2020
100

  • All medications at stable dose for 2-3 months
  • English as native and preferred language
  • MRI-compatible if taking part in functioinal MRI studies
  • Diagnosis of amnestic MCI based on criteria set forth by Petersen (2004)

  • History of severe mental illness
  • History of neurological disease or injury
  • Current untreated alcohol or substance abuse

In this Phase I study, participants will be randomly assigned to either the active interventiontranscranial direct current stimulationor a fake intervention to determine if noninvasive brain stimulation can enhance functioning in specific brain regions and networks. Laboratory and memory tests, as well as brain imaging, will be performed.

Name City State Zip Status Primary Contact
VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System, Ann Arbor, MI
Ann Arbor Michigan 48105 Recruiting Benjamin M Hampstead, PhD
404-321-6111
bhampste@med.umich.edu

Department of Veterans Affairs

Name Role Affiliation
Benjamin M. Hampstead, PhD Principal Investigator VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System

Name Phone Email
Benjamin M. Hampstead, PhD 404-321-6111 bhampste@med.umich.edu
Julia Laing, BS 734-764-4709 laingjul@med.umich.edu

NCT02155946

Promoting Adaptive Neuroplasticity in Mild Cognitive Impairment