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Viviana PEREZ MONTES

picture of Viviana Perez
Office(s): Division of Aging Biology (DAB)
Email Address: viviana.perezmontes@nih.gov

Biography

Dr. Viviana Perez Montes has joined the Division of Aging Biology of the national Institute on Aging. (Viviana.PerezMontes@nih.gov) . She now has the Cell Biology Portfolio in our Division, previously overseen by Jose Velazquez. As indicated in the short biography, below, she has left a highly productive career in research in the biology of aging to join the NIA.

Dr. Viviana Perez got her Ph.D. in Biomedical Sciences in 2004 at the Medical School of the University of Chile, Chile under Dr. Felipe Sierra’s mentorship. She then moved to San Antonio, TX to pursue her postdoctoral training under Dr. Arlan Richardson at the Barshop Institute for Aging and Longevity Studies. In 2011 she was appointed Assistant Professor in the Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics at Oregon State University, and as a Principal Investigator at the Linus Pauling Institute. In 2017 she was promoted Associate Professor with tenure. During her research career, she was continuously funded from a variety of Federal and non-Federal sources.  Her research interests were focused on the study of the oxidative stress theory of aging, the role of proteostasis in long-lived organisms using a comparative biology approach including redox state in naked mole rats, and more recently investigated the role of Nrf2 in mediating the anti-senescence effects of rapamycin. She has published 43 papers in peer-reviewed journals, 4 reviews and 3 book chapters. Dr. Perez has taught courses on biochemistry, metabolism and mechanisms of aging She has trained 21 undergraduate students, 5 graduate students, and 1 postdoctoral fellow.

Research Interests/Portfolio

Cell Biology Program (Viviana Perez, Ph.D.)

  • Cell senescence, apoptosis and cell proliferation in aging
  • Aging and the cellular microenvironment/extracellular matrix
  • Effect of the microenvironment on age-dependent tumors
  • Translation and posttranslational control
  • Age-dependent protein damage
  • Effects of age on protein turnover