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Joshua GOH

Joshua O. Goh
Title: Guest Researcher
Office(s): Brain Aging and Behavior Section (BABS)
Phone Number: +8622-3123456
Email Address: gohjo@mail.nih.gov

Biography

Joshua Goh is a Guest Researcher with the Brain Aging and Behavior Section of the Laboratory of Behavioral Neuroscience.

Overarching interest is in effect of brain biology and external experiences on cognitive processes over the human lifespan. Previous work involved investigating memory and visual processing differences with aging (biology) and across different cultural groups (experiences). Specifically, he used fMRI to study the neurocognitive differences between young and older adults, as well as individuals from Western and East Asians backgrounds.

Current focus is on the neural correlates of decision-making behavior and age-related changes in these neural correlates. Behavioral studies have shown that aging is associated with both a higher likelihood to make judgments in a mature manner, as well as a tendency to perseverate or falsely perceive a memory of an event. Uncovering the neural correlates of these age-related changes in decision-making thus stands as an important research area to inform and improve daily functioning as we go through life making various choices.

Representative Publications

1. Goh, J. O. S. (2010). Functional dedifferentiation and altered connectivity in older adults: Neural accounts of cognitive aging. Aging and Disease, 1(2), Advanced Access published online August 2010, Link to pdf version of Publication on Aging and Disease.

2. Goh, J. O. S., Suzuki, A., & Park, D. C. (2010). Reduced neural selectivity increases fMRI adaptation with age during face discrimination. NeuroImage, 51(1), 336-344.

3. Goh, J. O., Park, D. C. (2009). Culture sculpts the perceptual brain. Progress in Brain Research, 178, 95-111.

4. Goh, J., Chee, M. W. L., Tan, J. C., Venkatraman, V., Hebrank, A., Leshikar, E., Jenkins, L., Sutton. B., Gutchess, A., Park, D., (2007). Age and Culture Modulate Object Processing and Object-Scene Binding in the Ventral Visual Area. Cognitive, Affective and Behavioral Neuroscience, 7(1), 44-52.

5. Goh, J., Soon, C. S., Park, D., Gutchess, A., Hebrank, A., Chee, M. W. L., (2004). Cortical Areas Involved in Object, Background and Object-Background Processing Revealed with fMR-A. Journal of Neuroscience, 24(45), 10223-10228.

Joshua O. GOH's Curriculum vitae (PDF, 76.78KB)