Research and Funding

Inside NIA: A Blog for Researchers

Posted on September 25, 2013 by Vicky Cahan, Director, Office of Communications and Public Liaison.

Congratulations! You have just heard that your major manuscript has been accepted for publication. Countless hours of creative and hard work by you and your team went into this… oh, and funding from the NIA! What should you do next? Tell us, of course! My communications team wants to partner with you to raise awareness of your study findings. Read More

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Posted on September 18, 2013 by Rebecca Ferrell, Scientific Review Officer, Scientific Review Branch, Division of Extramural Activities.

Work jargon is not riveting conversation. Government acronyms? Even worse. But knowing the language does come in handy when you are trying to navigate an organization and its culture. Familiarity with NIH concepts and lingo can be useful when you need to discuss your A1 R01 application with your PO or SRO… the NIH has a language all its own. So, here are some key NIH terms, as well as some links to lists of NIH acronyms and definitions. You may know them all, or you may think you know them all. Some have changed recently. Some are routinely used incorrectly. Read More

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Posted on September 11, 2013 by Robin Barr, Director of the Division of Extramural Activities.

For the past few years, the NIA has been trying to increase the number of R21 grant applications and awards. The R21, of course, is an NIH-wide grant program “intended to encourage exploratory and developmental research projects by providing support for the early and conceptual stages…” You might wonder why we are so eager to support these awards. Well, it has to do with countering conservatism in the peer review of new science. Read More

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Posted on September 4, 2013 by Ron Kohanski, Deputy Director, Division of Aging Biology.

Will you join us in Bethesda, Maryland this coming October 30 and 31 to talk about aging research in a new way? The Trans-NIH Geroscience Interest Group (GSIG), with the support of the Alliance for Aging Research and the Gerontological Society of America, has organized a major meeting on aging as a risk factor for most chronic diseases. We hope you’ll be able to attend. The meeting is free and open to the public, but registration closes soon. Please register today to reserve your place! Read More

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Posted on August 28, 2013 by Laurie Ryan, Program Director, Alzheimer's Disease Clinical Trials, Division of Neuroscience.

Did you know that there’s a new way to search for funded research projects in Alzheimer’s disease? You can find out who is doing work in your area of interest in the US and other countries, and who is paying for that work. It’s a great way to identify funders, find collaborators, and search for gaps that may need to be addressed. How? By using… IADRP—The International Alzheimer’s Disease Research Portfolio. Read More

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Posted on August 21, 2013 by Robin Barr, Director of the Division of Extramural Activities.

As many people know, the federal budget situation in recent years has led to late starts in our annual award process. When we do not know how much money we will have for the year, we don’t make many awards. And as you’d imagine, when we are without a budget, it is hard to develop a payline for the year. One unintended consequence of these delayed starts is that we have made a very large share of our awards towards the end of the federal fiscal year. So our awards are stacked up in September—how do we untangle that traffic jam? Read More

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Posted on August 14, 2013 by Sue Zieman, Medical Officer, Division of Geriatrics and Clinical Gerontology.

Are you an early career gastroenterologist, neurologist, or orthopedist, or some other type of medical or surgical specialist? Do you spend time caring for older patients? If so, you’ve undoubtedly experienced the gaps in our understanding and treatment of this complex group of patients. The NIA has funding available for junior faculty clinician-researchers in medical and surgical specialties. These grants can help you establish a track record in aging research. Please apply, and share this opportunity with others. Read More

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Posted on August 7, 2013 by Nancy Nadon, Program Officer of the Biological Resources Program and Chief, Biological Resources Branch, Division of Aging Biology.

Have you come across a compound or treatment in your own research that you think might promote healthy aging? Now is the time to propose it be tested! An NIA program is accepting proposals for candidate interventions for testing in a genetically heterogeneous mouse model. The next deadline is September 20. Read More

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Posted on July 31, 2013 by Robin Barr, Director of the Division of Extramural Activities.

While preparing for a recent talk, I took a close look at our data on the scoring of grant applications. Every applicant wants great scores, and we want to help you understand how you’ll be scored, and why. For example, you may have heard that the Approach criterion score is highly correlated with the final impact score assigned to a grant application. Let’s get into the details of that. As most applicants for NIH grants know, reviewers assess research grant applications using five criteria. Read More

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Posted on July 24, 2013 by Marie A. Bernard, Deputy Director, National Institute on Aging.

The NIA summer training program builds the pipeline for the future biomedical research workforce. Our Summer Institute, just renamed the Butler-Williams Scholars Program, provides early to mid-career scientists with a unique opportunity to interact with leaders in the field of aging and health disparities research. Scientists who attend learn how to design strong projects and put together competitive grant applications, as well as develop relationships and networks that often continue long after the week-end goodbyes. I’d like to share with you how the training works its magic. Read More

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