Research and Funding

Inside NIA: A Blog for Researchers

Posted on January 28, 2015 by Dallas Anderson, Program Administrator, Dementias of Aging Branch, Division of Neuroscience.

As an NIA program officer for 11 years and counting I have the rare privilege of monitoring many study section meetings devoted almost exclusively to R03, R21, and R01 applications. One thing that leaps out of this experience is that a perpetually changing cast of peer reviewers raise the same basic criticisms over and over again. Read More

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Posted on January 21, 2015 by Robin Barr, Director of the Division of Extramural Activities.

Check out the Advisory Council of the National Institute on Aging’s first meeting of 2015. You can watch it online, January 28, from 8:00 AM to about 1:15 PM EST.  Read More

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Posted on January 14, 2015 by John Haaga, Deputy Director, Division of Behavioral and Social Research.

NIA funding announcements come with an expiration date. Program Announcements, for example, usually expire after three years. Lately, I’ve gotten some questions about what it means when a Program Announcement expires and there’s no new funding announcement specifically for that topic. Is the NIA still funding research on the topic? Yes, in almost all cases. Read More

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Posted on January 7, 2015 by Carl V. Hill, Director, Office of Special Populations.

We are celebrating some diversity landmarks at the National Institutes of Health! Late last year, more than $31 million was awarded to academic institutions to develop and test strategies that address the racial diversity of the United States biomedical workforce. As we highlight these critical efforts, I want to use this space to discuss them in relation to health disparities research. Read More

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Posted on December 17, 2014 by Creighton Phelps, Deputy Director, Division of Neuroscience.

Identifying the genes involved in Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias is of course no easy task. From among the thousands of gene candidates in the human genome, we need to determine which are involved in onset and progression, and which increase risk or offer protection. Where can researchers find the biological specimens needed to unlock these mysteries? The NIA-funded National Cell Repository for Alzheimer’s Disease, or NCRAD, a veritable treasure trove of biological material located at the Indiana University School of Medicine in Indianapolis. Read More

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Posted on December 10, 2014 by Marcel Salive, Program Officer, Division of Geriatrics and Clinical Gerontology.

The NIA has long been interested in understanding the role of aging on the development and progression of specific chronic diseases. More recently, we’ve begun to try to understand why two or more conditions might occur together in older people, and perhaps more importantly, what to do about it. NIA released a set of Program Announcements on self-management of chronic conditions, seeking applications using R01, R15, or R21 mechanisms. Read More

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Posted on December 3, 2014 by Robin Barr, Director of the Division of Extramural Activities.

We announced interim paylines on our funding policy site the other day. When you read that we are funding to the 5th percentile for research grants, and to a score of 14 on career awards and only paying NIA-reviewed applications that achieved scores of 10 or 11 you must wonder at our apparent miserliness. Why not release more awards now? Read More

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Posted on November 19, 2014 by NIA Blog Team, Division of Extramural Activities.

As we await news on our budget for this year and move forward on a number of initiatives, we thought we would reprise a few of the blog’s greatest hits of the last six months in case you missed them. If you missed a few, now is your chance to catch up. Every week, the NIA blog brings you important information on funding, grants, scientific resources, and other topics of interest to researchers. Have a question you’d like us to cover? Let us know by commenting on this post. Read More

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Posted on November 12, 2014 by Richard Hodes, Director, National Institute on Aging.

Like many other Institutes at NIH, the NIA assesses and updates its research directions every few years. This exercise is an important one, resulting in a Strategic Directions document that helps set and communicate priorities for the Institute and for aging research. We are updating our Strategic Directions, and I am seeking your input. Read More

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Posted on November 5, 2014 by Vicky Cahan, Director, Office of Communications and Public Liaison.

Much of our job in the NIA’s Office of Communications and Public Liaison is to help scientists talk and write about research in a clear, uncomplicated way. Many researchers struggle to find those simple words, and I notice similar difficulties again and again. Let me share with you tips for avoiding these common mistakes, and an example of how we worked with a scientist to rewrite scientific text for clearer communication.   Read More

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Posted on October 29, 2014 by Neil Buckholtz, Director, Division of Neuroscience.

Determining the best way forward in Alzheimer’s disease research is as challenging and complicated as the disorder itself. So what steps do we take next to accelerate the discovery and development of effective treatments for people at all stages of Alzheimer’s disease? That is the focus of the Alzheimer’s Disease Research Summit 2015: Path to Treatment and Prevention taking place February 9-10 at the NIH campus in Bethesda, Maryland. Read More

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