Research and Funding

Inside NIA: A Blog for Researchers

Posted on May 21, 2014 by Michael-David Kerns, Small Business Program Coordinator, Division of Extramural Activities.

Most government funding agencies, including the NIH, have special pots of money reserved for small businesses. “But M-D,” you say, “I’m in academia, I’m a scientist—what does business funding have to do with me?” But before you dismiss this funding opportunity, I invite you to look a little more closely. Read More

Share: Email Twitter Linkedin Facebook

Posted on May 14, 2014 by Britt Ehrhardt, Technical Writer/Editor Office of Communications and Public Liaison.

The National Institutes of Health puts out a lot of information for researchers. Websites, email newsletters, help desks… we really want to help you find your way to the resources you need. Check out the list below to make sure you’re not missing out on funding announcements and other important updates about applications, review, and other grants policies relevant to you and your work. Read More

2 Comments |  
Share: Email Twitter Linkedin Facebook

Posted on May 7, 2014 by Robin Barr, Director of the Division of Extramural Activities.

An R01 research project grant is the dollar bill of NIH. It is our most recognized award, our most common award, our most flexible award, and our most understood award. So why is it not our only award? Read More

2 Comments |  
Share: Email Twitter Linkedin Facebook

Posted on April 30, 2014 by Nina Silverberg, Assistant Director, Alzheimer’s Disease Centers Program, Division of Neuroscience.

Do you struggle to recruit older participants into your research? Researchers tell us that recruiting older adults—especially from underrepresented groups—is challenging, while the need for participants is great. Read More

8 Comments |  
Share: Email Twitter Linkedin Facebook

Posted on April 23, 2014 by Robin Barr, Director of the Division of Extramural Activities.

Half the reason for writing this time is to allow you a forum on our site to comment on what the new NIH resubmission policy means for the NIA community. But the other half of the reason is to explain what it might mean for us at NIA. As a refresher, the new resubmission policy means that after an unsuccessful A1 submission (or A0 submission) investigators may submit a similar application as a new (A0) application. NIH will not review the new submission for similarity to the prior application. Read More

6 Comments |  
Share: Email Twitter Linkedin Facebook

Posted on April 16, 2014 by Marie A. Bernard, Deputy Director, National Institute on Aging.

The NIA recently hired someone new, Melinda Kelley, to help us work with Congress, outside groups, and others who would like to interact with NIA leadership. The person who previously filled this role, the wonderful Tamara Jones, retired at the beginning of the year. Government agencies like the NIA must have a point of contact for Members of Congress and their staff. Legislation, including appropriations, affects all aspects of biomedical research. We communicate with Congress about programs and policies, providing information about new initiatives and developments in research. We also provide technical assistance when requested. This is not the responsibility of NIA alone: researchers all over the country are a powerful voice helping Congress understand the value of medical research to its constituents. Read More

2 Comments |  
Share: Email Twitter Linkedin Facebook

Posted on April 9, 2014 by Robin Barr, Director of the Division of Extramural Activities.

Why do some grant applications receive a percentile rank and others not? Applications for an NIA grant that are reviewed at the NIH Center for Scientific Review, or CSR, get a percentile rank. Applications for an NIA grant that are reviewed at the National Institute on Aging, through review panels organized by our NIA scientific review staff, do not receive percentile ranks. If an application is reviewed by NIA, we give it a priority score, not a percentile. This includes the R01s and investigator-initiated research grant applications that are reviewed at NIA. But this seems inconsistent! Either this means that we at NIA are crazy (which many have claimed) or that the use of percentiling needs explaining. Read More

6 Comments |  
Share: Email Twitter Linkedin Facebook

Posted on April 2, 2014 by Luigi Ferrucci, Director, NIA Intramural Research Program.

The Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging, or BLSA, is one of the world’s longest running studies of aging. Started in 1958, the BLSA enrolls healthy volunteers ages 20 years and older and follows them longitudinally—for life—even performing an autopsy in those who consented. I want to encourage researchers who study issues related to aging and have questions that require the unique design and depth of information available in the BLSA to submit an analysis proposal to use the data. Read More

2 Comments |  
Share: Email Twitter Linkedin Facebook

Posted on March 26, 2014 by Robin Barr, Director of the Division of Extramural Activities.

When the dust cleared on our budget this year, the NIA was blessed with a 12.5%, $130 million increase over fiscal year 2013’s sequester-dictated funding. As the NIH as a whole received a 3.4% increase, NIA’s 2014 funding reflects extraordinary recognition from Congress. In fiscal year 2013 (October 2012 to September 2013), we saw our worst success rate ever for research project grant applications—R01s, R21s, R03s, etc. NIA’s success rate was noticeably below the NIH average success rate, which was also among the lowest ever for NIH as a whole. Read More

2 Comments |  
Share: Email Twitter Linkedin Facebook

Posted on March 19, 2014 by Davide Guerrieri, Postdoctoral Intramural Research Training Award (IRTA) Fellow, Neuroplasticity and Behavioral Unit, Laboratory of Neurosciences, Intramural Research Program.

Doing science, living abroad, and learning how to speak and think in a new language. Not so easy! But like many of you, I enjoy challenges. So, I took up all of these, all at once. I left Italy 3 years ago to start a postdoc here in Baltimore, Maryland, at the National Institute on Aging. The NIA is an energetic, international environment, as is its parent organization, the National Institutes of Health. Although I am sure many of you left your country to pursue your science career, as I did, every story is different. Here is mine. Read More

5 Comments |  
Share: Email Twitter Linkedin Facebook

Pages