Research and Funding

Inside NIA: A Blog for Researchers

Posted on September 24, 2014 by Robin Barr, Director of the Division of Extramural Activities.

Fiscal year 2014 began with NIA staff—like many federal government workers—banned from our offices because the government was shut down. During the seemingly endless continuing funding resolutions that followed, we guessed and feared about the size of our budget for the year, establishing a very conservative payline during the long wait, and thereby causing great consternation among some in the research community. Then, the financial outlook—but not the weather—changed suddenly. Read More

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Posted on September 17, 2014 by Jennifer Illuzzi, Postdoctoral Intramural Research Training Award (IRTA) Fellow, Laboratory of Molecular Gerontology, Intramural Research Program.

Postdocs help power aging research. They receive NIA funding for training. They work with and for NIA grantees. In-house at NIA, they are a critical component of research conducted in NIA labs, which we call “intramural” research. Across the research community, postdoctoral research fellows contribute the long hours necessary to organize and implement research activities. I know this because I am one of them, and colleagues, I see how hard you work! Read More

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Posted on September 10, 2014 by Robin Barr, Director of the Division of Extramural Activities.

NIH announced a change in resubmission policy in April. This blog post covers a different feature of the April policy change: how investigators can make decisions about grant applications that are not funded the first time they are submitted for consideration. If you’re not familiar with the lingo, A0 is the first submission of an application, while A1 is a resubmission of that same application, after some deeply considered changes. With the policy change, investigators now have a real choice after an A0 grant application is not funded. Read More

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Posted on August 27, 2014 by Marie A. Bernard, Deputy Director, National Institute on Aging.

Earlier this month, I spent a week with NIA’s 2014 Butler-Williams Scholars Program (formerly the NIA Summer Institute on Aging Research). These early career researchers from diverse backgrounds come to Bethesda from all over the country. They learn about the best of our science—aging biology, behavioral and social research, neuroscience, geriatrics and clinical gerontology, and health disparities. Perhaps even more importantly, they learn about grantsmanship, share challenges, and make new connections. It’s something that the NIA has been doing for decades: bringing bright, promising scientists to residential programs to grow their skills and encourage them to stay the course. What an honor it was to meet this year’s class. And what fun! Read More

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Here’s a new funding opportunity that might interest you. The support is for a clinical trial on reducing chronic inflammation. I’m the program officer for this area, and I’d like to tell you a bit more about it. I particularly wanted to write this blog because this new funding is through the U01 mechanism, and not everyone is familiar with exactly how that works. And, the deadline for the letter of intent is coming up next month, so I urge you to get in touch and start writing! Read More

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Posted on July 30, 2014 by Neil Buckholtz, Director, Division of Neuroscience.

International collaboration is vital to advancing Alzheimer’s disease research on multiple fronts, from genetics to biomarkers to translational research. Just weeks ago, at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference® 2014 in Copenhagen, I was pleased to witness firsthand the intense commitment among scientists worldwide to find solutions to this devastating disease. From early morning to late evening, at symposium and plenary sessions, during poster sessions and coffee breaks, at add-on meetings and consortium sessions, some 4,300 investigators from 75 different countries shared recent findings and explored ways to overcome the challenges of finding ways to treat or prevent this complex disease. Read More

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Posted on July 23, 2014 by Carl V. Hill, Director, Office of Special Populations.

Do you conduct research on health disparities? Are you a grad student, postdoc, or junior faculty member? Are you interested to learn about some new funding that’s just become available from the NIA? Current NIA grantees can apply for extra funding to add you their grants. That’s right! There is additional money to add appropriate, rigorous health disparities projects and researchers to existing NIA grants. Read More

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Posted on July 16, 2014 by Marie A. Bernard, Deputy Director, National Institute on Aging.

I went to medical school at a time when women were just beginning to be seen in large numbers in medicine and science. My class at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine was a quarter women, and that was the largest proportion they’d ever had. I ran into all of the challenges you’d imagine—being one of a very few minority women on clinical rotations, being picked on or ignored because I was female or because I was black, or maybe both. Read More

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Did you know that the National Institute on Aging has a national health education campaign? Launched in 2011, Go4Life® encourages older adults to reap health benefits by making physical activity part of their daily lives. If you do research with older adults or on senior wellness and health education programs, you might be especially interested in the details of our campaign. Read More

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Posted on June 25, 2014 by Robin Barr, Director of the Division of Extramural Activities.

So, you just received an automated email that asks you to submit “just-in-time” information for your application. Does that mean NIA is going to pay it? I wish! Unfortunately, that just-in-time request brings false hope to too many. Here’s some explanation of the just-in-time messages and our data on who gets funded. It might help you consider the priority of responding to a just-in-time request for information, if your application to NIA has a percentile score of 21 or poorer. Read More

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