Research and Funding

Inside NIA: A Blog for Researchers

Posted on March 4, 2015 by Ron Kohanski, Deputy Director, Division of Aging Biology.

There are a handful of run-of-the-mill ‘R’ grants offered by the NIH that are familiar to most investigators: everyone knows the R01. Ever heard of the R34? Not one of those that most people know. The R34 is a “planning grant.” Read More

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Posted on February 25, 2015 by Robin Barr, Director of the Division of Extramural Activities.

Last year (fiscal year 2014), we received $100 million of additional appropriated funds largely to support research on Alzheimer’s disease. We allocated those funds using mechanisms including  multi-year funding to provide a revenue stream for competing dollars in future years as well, as we were uncertain that future year budgets would provide additional increases. This year (fiscal year 2015), our budget was boosted by an additional $25 million for research on Alzheimer’s disease. The President’s Budget for fiscal year 2016 proposes another $50 million for Alzheimer’s research. These trends suggest more opportunities to support this area than we had earlier anticipated. Read More

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Posted on February 18, 2015 by Richard Hodes, Director, National Institute on Aging.

This is an extremely difficult time in aging research, among the most challenging since I came to the NIA in 1993. Last week, we announced a funding line policy with the lowest payline in our history. NIA is spending just as much money on research grants as last year, and funding just as many grants, but a great increase in the number of applications has resulted in a lower payline. The energy of our robust and growing field is meeting the reality of budgets that have failed to keep pace, in real terms, over time. Yet, our mission on Alzheimer’s disease is receiving increased public attention and garnered additional financial support, and, even with the struggle in our general payline, we are grateful for more flexibility there. Read More

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Posted on February 11, 2015 by Robin Barr, Director of the Division of Extramural Activities.

I wrote in December that 2015 is going to be a tough year for us, and so it is turning out to be. To recap that post, we are seeing increasing numbers of applications following the change in resubmission policy announced last April. Unfortunately, with the exception of additional Alzheimer’s funds, we are not seeing increasing funds. That is why we anticipated a tighter payline this year. So now we have announced a payline at the 7th percentile for under-500k applications and a line at the 4th percentile for over-500k applications. (New and early-stage investigator R01 applications will have three- and five-point advantages in this payline.) Read More

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Posted on February 4, 2015 by Arlene Jackson, Recruitment Specialist, Intramural Research Program.

Do you know a high school, college, graduate or medical/dental student interested in biomedical research? Perhaps s/he is looking for an internship to help inform her/his career path. How about recommending the student come work for a summer at the National Institute on Aging? Each summer, NIA’s Intramural Research Program opens its lab doors for an 8 to 10-week intensive research experience. Read More

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Posted on January 28, 2015 by Dallas Anderson, Program Administrator, Dementias of Aging Branch, Division of Neuroscience.

As an NIA program officer for 11 years and counting I have the rare privilege of monitoring many study section meetings devoted almost exclusively to R03, R21, and R01 applications. One thing that leaps out of this experience is that a perpetually changing cast of peer reviewers raise the same basic criticisms over and over again. Read More

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Posted on January 21, 2015 by Robin Barr, Director of the Division of Extramural Activities.

Check out the Advisory Council of the National Institute on Aging’s first meeting of 2015. You can watch it online, January 28, from 8:00 AM to about 1:15 PM EST.  Read More

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Posted on January 14, 2015 by John Haaga, Deputy Director, Division of Behavioral and Social Research.

NIA funding announcements come with an expiration date. Program Announcements, for example, usually expire after three years. Lately, I’ve gotten some questions about what it means when a Program Announcement expires and there’s no new funding announcement specifically for that topic. Is the NIA still funding research on the topic? Yes, in almost all cases. Read More

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Posted on January 7, 2015 by Carl V. Hill, Director, Office of Special Populations.

We are celebrating some diversity landmarks at the National Institutes of Health! Late last year, more than $31 million was awarded to academic institutions to develop and test strategies that address the racial diversity of the United States biomedical workforce. As we highlight these critical efforts, I want to use this space to discuss them in relation to health disparities research. Read More

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Posted on December 17, 2014 by Creighton Phelps, Deputy Director, Division of Neuroscience.

Identifying the genes involved in Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias is of course no easy task. From among the thousands of gene candidates in the human genome, we need to determine which are involved in onset and progression, and which increase risk or offer protection. Where can researchers find the biological specimens needed to unlock these mysteries? The NIA-funded National Cell Repository for Alzheimer’s Disease, or NCRAD, a veritable treasure trove of biological material located at the Indiana University School of Medicine in Indianapolis. Read More

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