OCPL

Office of Communications and Public Liaison

Research consortium including NIH proposes diagnostic criteria for sarcopenia

Sarcopenia, a loss of muscle mass often associated with weakness, is a commonly recognized cause of disability in older people. However, without consensus on ways to specifically measure this condition, the development of interventions for sarcopenia has been challenging. Now, a team of researchers proposes a comprehensive set of diagnostic criteria, presented April 15, 2014, in six special articles in the Journals of Gerontology: Medical Sciences.

Blog post - a valuable data resource: Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging

Cartoon of four people in conversation.

The Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging, or BLSA, is one of the world’s longest running studies of aging. Started in 1958, the BLSA enrolls healthy volunteers ages 20 years and older and follows them longitudinally—for life. The BLSA has accumulated a great deal of valuable data, and researchers can request access to this data for their own investigations of important scientific questions.

Blog post - funding policy and budget update

Cartoon of four people in conversation.The NIA updated its 2014 funding policy on March 20. In a new blog post, Robin Barr, director of the NIA Division of Extramural Activities, describes the funding policy, paylines, success rates, and how this year's funding compares to previous years.

NIHSeniorHealth.gov offers comprehensive information on end of life

A new Web resource from the National Institutes of Health is aimed at helping people address a sensitive subject—the end of life. The latest addition to NIHSeniorHealth, the health and wellness website for older adults, the End of Life module provides visitors with information about the most common issues faced by the dying and their caregivers.

NIH urges older Americans to protect their kidneys

In recognition of World Kidney Day 2014 on March 13, the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) and the National Institute on Aging (NIA) at the National Institutes of Health remind older Americans about the importance of protecting their kidneys and urge them to better understand the decline of kidney function as people age.

Video of February 26 Council meeting now available

The National Advisory Council on Aging met on February 26, 2014, and the video recording of the meeting is now available. The agenda and other meeting materials are also available.

Blog post - NIA's support of LGBT research

Cartoon of four people in conversation.

Researchers know relatively little about the health of older lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender Americans. When it comes to research on aging, these communities are significantly under-studied. In a new blog post, Kate Nagy of NIA's Office of Planning, Analysis, and Evaluation describes NIA and NIH activities and funding opportunities for health research with these groups.

Blog post - are impact ratings random?

Cartoon of four people in conversation.Applicants sometimes ask us if grant reviewers can really determine which grant applications are the very best. When only a small proportion of applications can be funded, can the NIH scientific peer review process identify the very highest quality applications in a large group of high quality applications?

New to aging research? Apply to the Butler-Williams Scholars Program by March 28

Emerging researchers, including those with limited involvement in research on aging, are invited to apply for the next Butler-Williams Scholars Program (formerly the Summer Institute on Aging Research), to be held August 4-8, 2014, at the National Institutes of Health campus in Bethesda, MD.

Sponsored by NIA, the 5-day program will explore research design relative to aging, including issues relevant to racial/ethnic minorities and health disparities. The agenda will include:

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