DAB

The average age of first-time R01 funded investigators who have PhDs remains 42 even after seven years of policies at NIH to increase the numbers of new and early-stage investigators.  And, over the same interval, age has continued to increase for first-time R01-funded MDs and MD-PhDs, despite the policies we have in place. What is going on?

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I want to share with you part of a recent discussion I had with the Friends of the NIA about the importance of public-private partnerships in aging research.

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How do I write a grant application that will get funded?

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Following every meeting of the National Advisory Council on Aging, we set about the task of fundi

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The deadline is fast approaching for the 2015 Butler-Williams Scholars Program, NIA’s premier aging research training program. Apply by March 27, 2015, and encourage your contacts and friends to do the same.

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Geroscience—a field that looks at the relationship between aging and disease—has gained lots of traction within the scientific community. I think this is a good thing. Anybody who heard me talk recently would be excused if they were to think that this is now the primary focus of NIA’s Division of Aging Biology… Well, not so! The centerpiece of work funded by the Division of Aging Biology remains basic research into the biological roots of aging. The application of this research to human health and disease is a welcome addition—“icing on the cake,” if you will.

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NIH-funded researchers identify drugs to eliminate senescent cells in mice, improving health and function

Researchers led by a team from the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, have identified a new class of drugs called “senolytics” that target and kill aged—senescent—cells in mice. The team also found that a single dose of senolytic drugs led to improvements in the animals’ health and function.

There are a handful of run-of-the-mill ‘R’ grants offered by the NIH that are familiar to most investigators: everyone knows the R01. Ever heard of the R34? Not one of those that most people know. The R34 is a “planning grant.”

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New opportunities for aging research found in turquoise killifish

Animal models are an essential resource in the research enterprise. Studies in flies, worms, mice, and even yeast, have led to breakthroughs in treating major health problems in humans, such as cancer, diabetes, and heart disease. These animals are also important in studying the basic biology of aging. They might not look anything like us on the outside, but deep in the cells, they share similar biological mechanisms and genes that contribute to physical changes and diseases associated with age.

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