Health and Aging

Healthy Aging and Longevity

NIHSeniorHealth.gov offers info on quitting smoking for older adults

The National Institutes of Health has released a new Web resource to help older adults stop smoking. Quitting Smoking for Older Adults, a new topic from NIHSeniorHealth, offers videos, worksheets, interactive features, strategies, quizzes, and more for older smokers who want to or are thinking of quitting.

Structured physical activity program can help maintain mobility in vulnerable older people

A carefully structured, moderate physical activity program can reduce risk of losing the ability to walk without assistance, perhaps the single most important factor in whether vulnerable older people can maintain their independence, a study has found.

Older people who lose their mobility have higher rates of disease, disability, and death. A substantial body of research has shown the benefits of regular physical activity for a variety of populations and health conditions. But none has identified a specific intervention to prevent mobility disability.

Resveratrol does not affect health, longevity in population study

Resveratrol, a compound in red wine, grapes, and nuts, has been the focus of many studies for its effects on aging and disease. Researchers have found it to improve the health (and in some cases, longevity) of animals, including mice and nonhuman primates. However, in a study published online by JAMA Internal Medicine on May 12, 2014, researchers report that dietary resveratrol did not provide such effects in a group of community-dwelling, older people in Italy.

Geroscience recommendations, summaries available

Scientists suggest more research into link between aging, chronic disease

Longevity gene may boost brain power

Scientists showed that people who have a variant of a longevity gene, called KLOTHO, have improved brain skills such as thinking, learning and memory regardless of their age, sex, or whether they have a genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease. Increasing KLOTHO gene levels in mice made them smarter, possibly by increasing the strength of connections between nerve cells in the brain. The study was partly funded by the National Institutes of Health.

NIH urges older Americans to protect their kidneys

In recognition of World Kidney Day 2014 on March 13, the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) and the National Institute on Aging (NIA) at the National Institutes of Health remind older Americans about the importance of protecting their kidneys and urge them to better understand the decline of kidney function as people age.

Request for Information: Mechanisms of Physical Activity-Induced Health Benefits

Increased physical activity has been linked to numerous health benefits, including improved cardiovascular and respiratory health, insulin sensitivity, bone and muscle strength, and cognitive function. In addition, physical activity is associated with reductions in coronary heart disease, stroke, some cancers, type 2 diabetes, and depression. For most health outcomes, benefits increase as the amount of physical activity increases through higher intensity, greater frequency or longer duration, although the magnitude of these benefits diminishes with advancing age.

NIH researchers find vitamin D binding protein may help to assess vitamin D deficiency in African and white Americans

Measuring vitamin D binding protein (VDBP) may be important for accurately determining vitamin D deficiency, especially among African Americans, reports a team of researchers led by the National Institute on Aging, NIH, in the November 21, 2013 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Aging with HIV: Responding to an emerging challenge

AIDS red ribbonThe development of highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) for HIV infection in the 1990s is one of modern medicine’s most dramatic success stories. Once effectively a death sentence, HIV infection can now be considered a serious, but largely manageable, chronic condition. Today, a person who begins HAART can reasonably expect to live another 30 to 50 years, and often well into older age.

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