OCPL

Office of Communications and Public Liaison

NIH summit delivers recommendations to transform Alzheimer’s disease research

The National Institutes of Health released recommendations today that provide a framework for a bold and transformative Alzheimer’s disease research agenda.

Read latest Connections newsletter for Alzheimer’s research news

The Spring 2015 issue of Connections, the e-newsletter from NIA’s Alzheimer’s Disease Education and Referral (ADEAR) Center, is now available!

In the latest issue:

In memoriam: Richard M. Suzman, Ph.D.

Dr Richard Suzman speaking at a conference

Richard M. Suzman, Ph.D., director of NIA’s Division of Behavioral and Social Research, died on April 16, 2015. He was 72.

I want to share with you part of a recent discussion I had with the Friends of the NIA about the importance of public-private partnerships in aging research.

ShareThis: 

The explosion of Big Data promises to transform biomedical research, but all too often researcher

ShareThis: 

Health professionals: Find Alzheimer’s and dementia resources

Do you work with patients or clients with cognitive impairment? Visit our new online portal for free clinical practice tools, training materials, and other resources for physicians, nurses, social workers, and other professionals.

You’ll find:

Find information about volunteering for Alzheimer's clinical trials and studies

Researchers are making great advances in identifying potential new ways to help diagnose, treat, and even prevent Alzheimer’s disease. But it will take many people, including older adults, volunteering for research studies and trials to help find the answers. Find out what you can do. Visit our new webpage—Volunteer for Alzheimer’s Research—to:

Following every meeting of the National Advisory Council on Aging, we set about the task of fundi

ShareThis: 

The deadline is fast approaching for the 2015 Butler-Williams Scholars Program, NIA’s premier aging research training program. Apply by March 27, 2015, and encourage your contacts and friends to do the same.

ShareThis: 

Physical activity associated with fewer aging brain-related movement problems

Age-related brain lesions known as white matter hyperintensities (WMH) have been linked to movement problems and disabilities in late life. A recent study suggests that physically active older people may have fewer movement problems caused by WMH. The study, supported in part by NIA, was published online March 11, 2015, in Neurology.

Páginas

Subscribe to RSS - OCPL