DN

Increased brain activity may compensate for amyloid pathology in older brains

Researchers have long wondered why some older people remain cognitively normal despite having abnormal levels of beta-amyloid in their brains, a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease. While research has shown that older adults with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), which often leads to Alzheimer’s, frequently have increased activity in the hippocampus compared to their cognitively healthy peers, scientists questioned what the hyperactivity represented. Was it helping to compensate for declining brain function or signaling onset of the disease?

Learn about participating in Alzheimer’s research in new NIH booklet

Many people who have been affected by Alzheimer’s wonder how they can help combat this devastating disease. Volunteering to participate in research is one powerful way. Right now, at least 70,000 volunteers are needed for more than 150 active Alzheimer’s and related clinical trials and studies in the United States. All kinds of people, including healthy older adults, can join in this critical research.

Blog post - A new generation of early career researchers in aging

Cartoon of four people in conversation.

Every summer, early career researchers from diverse backgrounds come from all over the U.S. to spend a week at the National Institute on Aging’s 2014 Butler-Williams Scholars Program. They explore the best of NIA’s science, learn about grantsmanship, share challenges, and make new connections.

NIH-funded researchers link epigenome changes to Alzheimer’s disease

Two new NIH-supported studies have shown that a person’s epigenome—the chemical modifications, or marks, on our DNA that turn gene activity on and off—may influence Alzheimer’s disease-related changes in the brain.  The two groups of researchers examined brain tissue donated by volunteers with Alzheimer’s and those free of the disease and linked a specific epigenome marker, DNA methylation, with Alzheimer’s pathology in the brain.

NIH-supported study shows promise for blood test for Alzheimer’s disease

Preliminary findings from a study by National Institute on Aging (NIA) scientists and colleagues showed that a blood test for Alzheimer’s-related proteins may accurately predict who might be at risk for the disease years before symptoms develop. The test measured the levels of several tau and amyloid proteins—the hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease—in exosomes, microscopic organelles shed by brain cells.

Blog post - Funding opportunity for research on chronic inflammation

Cartoon of four people in conversation.

Chronic inflammation increases with aging, and it is linked to heart disease, diabetes, dementia, and cancer, as well as frailty and disability. The NIA is offering new funding for research on chronic inflammation. If you study inflammation, please read about this grant opportunity and consider applying.

Physical activity and Alzheimer’s-related hippocampal atrophy

Physical activity may help prevent atrophy of the hippocampus, a brain region important for learning and memory that often shrinks in the brains of people with Alzheimer’s disease. A recent study that looked at the rate of atrophy over 18 months in cognitively normal older adults suggests that physical activity may help prevent or delay this Alzheimer’s-related change.

Blog post - Alzheimer’s disease research & the U.S. NIH: what’s new?

Cartoon of four people in conversation.

International collaboration is vital to advancing Alzheimer’s disease research, from genetics to biomarkers to translational research.

Páginas

Subscribe to RSS - DN