Health and Aging

Alzheimer's Disease

Health professionals: Find Alzheimer’s and dementia resources

Do you work with patients or clients with cognitive impairment? Visit our new online portal for free clinical practice tools, training materials, and other resources for physicians, nurses, social workers, and other professionals.

You’ll find:

Find information about volunteering for Alzheimer's clinical trials and studies

Researchers are making great advances in identifying potential new ways to help diagnose, treat, and even prevent Alzheimer’s disease. But it will take many people, including older adults, volunteering for research studies and trials to help find the answers. Find out what you can do. Visit our new webpage—Volunteer for Alzheimer’s Research—to:

Physical activity associated with fewer aging brain-related movement problems

Age-related brain lesions known as white matter hyperintensities (WMH) have been linked to movement problems and disabilities in late life. A recent study suggests that physically active older people may have fewer movement problems caused by WMH. The study, supported in part by NIA, was published online March 11, 2015, in Neurology.

NIH-led effort launches Big Data portal for Alzheimer’s drug discovery

A National Institutes of Health-led public-private partnership to transform and accelerate drug development achieved a significant milestone today with the launch of a new Alzheimer’s Big Data portal—including delivery of the first wave of data—for use by the research community. The new data sharing and analysis resource is part of the Accelerating Medicines Partnership (AMP), an unprecedented venture bringing together NIH, the U.S.

Alzheimer’s research news featured in fall 2014 Connections

The Fall 2014 issue of Connections, the e-newsletter from NIA’s Alzheimer’s Disease Education and Referral (ADEAR) Center, is now available!

In the latest issue:

NIH announces grants for frontotemporal degeneration research

The National Institutes of Health will award three large, five-year projects on a specific form of dementia, known as frontotemporal because of the areas of the brain that are affected. The projects, funded by the NIH's National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), National Institute on Aging (NIA) and the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS), announced today total more than $5.9 million for 2014.

Groundbreaking Alzheimer’s model in petri dish points to amyloid as disease trigger

NIA-supported researchers recently developed an innovative method to culture human brain cells in the laboratory and then modeled, for the first time, the cascade of cellular changes involved in the onset and progression of Alzheimer’s disease. The findings support the “amyloid hypothesis,” a 30-year-old theory that the build-up of beta-amyloid protein in the brain kick starts the toxic changes that lead to tau tangles, and ultimately, cell death. The results by researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), Boston, were published online Oct.

Increased brain activity may compensate for amyloid pathology in older brains

Researchers have long wondered why some older people remain cognitively normal despite having abnormal levels of beta-amyloid in their brains, a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease. While research has shown that older adults with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), which often leads to Alzheimer’s, frequently have increased activity in the hippocampus compared to their cognitively healthy peers, scientists questioned what the hyperactivity represented. Was it helping to compensate for declining brain function or signaling onset of the disease?

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