Announcements

  • December 15, 2014

    Dr. Gammatikakis in a white lab coat, with laboratory equipment visible behind.Dr. Yannis Grammatikakis is a postdoctoral fellow in the RNA Regulation Section of the National Institute on Aging Intramural Research Program. In a new post for the NIH i am intramural blog, he discusses non-coding ribonucleic acid, or RNA, and its role in gene expression and the basic biology of aging. Dr. Grammatikakis explains his long-standing interest in RNA, "It is such a flexible and diverse molecule, but also largely unexplored."

    Read the full blog post: Non-Coding RNAs Are Rising Stars in Gene Expression Regulation

  • December 11, 2014

    Cartoon of four people in conversation.

    The NIA has long been interested in understanding the role of aging on the development and progression of specific chronic diseases. More recently, we’ve begun to try to understand why two or more conditions might occur together in older people, and perhaps more importantly, what to do about it. A recent post by Dr. Marcel Salive, Program Officer of the Division of Geriatrics and Clinical Gerontology, discusses NIA’s new program announcements on self-management of chronic conditions, seeking applications using R01, R15, or R21 mechanisms.

    Read the full blog post:  When is one not enough? Multiple chronic conditions research

    The NIA blog publishes weekly with information on grants and funding policy, research priorities, scientific meetings, and topics of interest to researchers and others in the scientific community. Subscribe to get it weekly in your email inbox, or grab the RSS feed.

  • December 10, 2014

    Almost 16 million Americans aged 65 and older report having at least one disability, according to a new report by the U.S. Census Bureau (PDF, 1.5M), commissioned and funded by the NIA. This is the first Census report on disabilities among older people and looks at disability status by age, sex, marital status, education, and poverty status.

    The report is based on data from the American Community Survey (ACS) and covers six types of disability, including difficulty in hearing, vision, cognition, walking, self-care, and independent living. People who reported any one of the six disability types are considered to have a disability. The most common type of disability was difficulty in walking or climbing stairs, which was reported by two-thirds of those with a disability.

    The report includes information on the geographic distribution of older people with a disability, with data shown at the county level. The prevalence of disability at older ages varies widely across counties; the Appalachian region, the lower Mississippi Valley, and parts of the upper South have particularly high rates. The report includes a number of maps, including one showing the percentage of older people living alone in poverty with a disability.

    The oldest old—those aged 85 and older—had the highest prevalence of disability. While this group represented 13.6 percent of the total older population, they accounted for 25.4 percent of those with a disability.

    Reference: He, Wan and Luke J. Larsen, U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey Reports, ACS-29, Older Americans With a Disability: 2008 – 2012, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, DC, 2014.

  • December 3, 2014

    Cartoon of four people in conversation.

    The NIA has announced interim paylines for fiscal year 2015. Grant applicants and the research community are often very interested in these paylines and funding policies. At this time, the NIA is funding to the 5th percentile for research grants, and to a score of 14 on career awards and only paying NIA-reviewed applications that achieved scores of 10 or 11. In a post for NIA’s blog, Dr. Robin Barr, director of the Division of Extramural Activities, goes into depth, focusing on how NIA is managing paylines in light of recent policy changes.

    Read the full blog post: Interim paylines

    The NIA blog publishes weekly with information on grants and funding policy, research priorities, scientific meetings, and topics of interest to researchers and others in the scientific community. Subscribe to get it weekly in your email inbox, or grab the RSS feed.

  • November 19, 2014

    Today, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) issued a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM), which proposes regulations to implement reporting requirements for clinical trials that are subject to Title VIII of the Food and Drug Administration Amendments Act of 2007 (FDAAA). The proposed rule clarifies requirements to clinical researchers for registering clinical trials and submitting summary trial results information to ClinicalTrials.gov, a publicly accessible database operated by the National Library of Medicine, part of the National Institutes of Health. A major change from current requirements that is proposed in the NPRM is the expansion of the scope of clinical trials required to submit summary results to include trials of unapproved, unlicensed, and uncleared products.

    In addition, NIH proposed a policy to promote transparency for all NIH-funded clinical trials, whether or not they are subject to FDAAA. The proposed policy expects registration and submission of results information like that required by FDAAA in ClinicalTrials.gov of every clinical trial that receives NIH dollars.

    Read the news release along with the NPRM and NIH proposed policy changes. HHS and NIH encourage public feedback during the 90-day comment period.

  • November 17, 2014

    Cartoon of four people in conversation.

    Like many other Institutes at NIH, NIA assesses and updates its research directions every few years. This exercise is an important one, resulting in a Strategic Directions document that helps set and communicate priorities for the Institute and for aging research. NIA is updating its Strategic Directions. Dr. Richard J. Hodes, NIA director, has a new blog post explaining how we use the Strategic Directions document and inviting participation. “We need to hear your voices to allow us to prepare a document that truly does reflect an ambitious and fitting agenda for the times ahead,” Dr. Hodes writes.

    Read the full blog post: Strategic Directions for Research on Aging

    The NIA blog publishes weekly with information on grants and funding policy, research priorities, scientific meetings, and topics of interest to researchers and others in the scientific community. Subscribe to get it weekly in your email inbox, or grab the RSS feed.

  • November 10, 2014

    Subject: Dr. Joanne Murabito, December 4 at the GeroScience Interest Group (GSIG) fall seminar (Open to the Public)

    When: Thursday, December 4, 2014, 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM

    Where: Lipsett Amphitheater, Building 10, NIH

    Title: “Genetics of Aging Phenotypes over the Life Course: A Population Perspective”

    “Open to the Public (please allow time for the NIH security check)”

    The Trans-NIH GeroScience Interest Group (GSIG) cordially invites you to its fall seminar, featuring Dr. Joanne Murabito. Dr. Murabito is Director of the Clinic at the Framingham Heart Study, and she is an Associate Professor of Medicine at Boston University School of Medicine. Dr. Murabito’s research goals have focused on aging and reproductive traits in the Framingham Heart study and beyond. Specifically, her research program focuses on using the tools of epidemiology and high-throughput genetic platforms to better understand the natural history of aging and to detect novel pathways and mechanisms for aging-related traits. Studies in her laboratory encompass analysis of genome-wide association studies of aging phenotypes in human population samples using common and rare variant platforms; and investigation of determinants of healthy aging in the Framingham population. Dr. Murabito’s current projects include the epidemiology of centenarian experience in Framingham, physical activity and function, and biomarkers of frailty. She leads several international consortia dedicated to uncovering genes for aging-related traits, including age at menarche, age at natural menopause, and longevity. She collaborates with scientists at the Jackson Laboratory Nathan Shock Center of Excellence in the Basic Biology of Aging to further identify the functional relevance of human association findings. Dr. Murabito is keenly interested in how to reach older participants through novel technologies and use those technologies to maintain health. Dr. Murabito’s research has demonstrated that multiple genetic loci underlie reproductive aging, which are associated with many downstream aging-related disorders including obesity, DNA damage and repair and immune function.

    The GeroScience Interest Group (GSIG) was formed to enhance opportunities for discussion of the intersection between the biology of aging and the biology of disease and conditions that are of interest across ICs. It is focused on basic biology, but with a longer view towards translation. If you are interested in learning more, please visit the GSIG web site.

    The seminar will be videocast at http://videocast.nih.gov and archived in the GSIG web site.

    Sign Language Interpreters will be provided. Individuals with disabilities who need reasonable accommodation to participate in this event should contact Dr. Young Oh at yoh@nhlbi.nih.gov or at 301/435-0560 or Dr. Ronald Kohanski at kohanskir@mail.nih.gov or at 301/496-6402.

    Please send your questions related to the seminar to yoh@nhlbi.nih.gov or kohanskir@mail.nih.gov.

  • November 5, 2014

    Cartoon of four people in conversation.

    Researchers writing grants or giving presentations strive to speak and write clearly about their science. However, many researchers struggle to find those simple words. “Plain language” is a common term for communication that your audience can easily understand and use the first time they hear or read it. This week, Vicky Cahan, Director of the NIA Office of Communications and Public Liaison, shares tips for avoiding common mistakes, and an example of how we worked with a scientist to rewrite scientific text for clearer communication.

    Read the full blog post: Explaining your science—tips for clear communication

    The NIA blog publishes weekly with information on grants and funding policy, research priorities, scientific meetings, and topics of interest to researchers and others in the scientific community. Subscribe to get it weekly in your email inbox, or grab the RSS feed.

  • November 7, 2014

    The November 2014 issue of NIA’s Spotlight on Aging Research e-newsletter is now available!

    In this issue:

    • Get an update about the NIA research budget and coming events from NIA Director Dr. Richard Hodes.
    • Read about past, present, and future research into falls, frailty, exceptional longevity, and more in a conversation with NIA’s director of geriatrics and clinical gerontology.
    • Watch a video of early- and mid-career researchers reflecting on the 2014 Butler-Williams Scholars Program.
    • Find out what’s new with Go4Life®, NIA’s exercise and physical activity campaign for older adults.
    • Learn about brain donation among African Americans and strategies for encouraging participation in Alzheimer’s research.
    • Read about the challenges experienced by dementia caregivers and a national panel’s ideas to better support caregivers.
    • Browse NIA research news, including funding opportunities, study findings, and recent NIA grant awards.

    Looking for more news from NIA?

  • November 4, 2014

    The Fall 2014 issue of Connections, the e-newsletter from NIA’s Alzheimer’s Disease Education and Referral (ADEAR) Center, is now available!

    In the latest issue:

    • Learn about brain donation by African Americans and how researchers build relationships and trust to encourage this group’s participation in medical studies.
    • Read about the challenges of dementia caregivers and a national Alzheimer’s panel’s ideas to better support them.
    • Find out about resources NIA offers to help primary care physicians screen for cognitive impairment, including a new tip sheet.
    • Check out the latest NIA-funded research findings related to Alzheimer’s.
    • Browse a list of clinical trials now recruiting.

    Want to get future issues of Connections and other Alzheimer’s and aging research news by e-mail? Sign up today! And follow us on Twitter @Alzheimers_NIH.

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