Announcements

  • May 6, 2014

    Cartoon of four people in conversation.

    We offer many different kinds of grants: training grants, fellowships, career development awards, scientific meeting grants, awards for small businesses, centers, and even construction awards (elsewhere at NIH).

    To distinguish between these different kinds of grants, we name these programs differently and code them with different strings of letters and numbers. The letter-number strings are called "activity codes." Dr. Robin Barr, director of the NIA Division of Extramural Activities, has a new blog post describing activity codes for research grants. "An R01 research project grant is the dollar bill of NIH," Dr. Barr writes. "It is our most recognized award, our most common award, our most flexible award, and our most understood award. So why is it not our only award?"

    Read the full blog post: Activity codes—why not R01 and only R01?

    The NIA blog publishes weekly with information on grants and funding policy, research priorities, scientific meetings, and topics of interest to researchers and others in the scientific community. Subscribe to get it weekly in your email inbox, or grab the RSS feed.

     

  • May 5, 2014

    The National Institute on Aging (NIA) is recruiting a dynamic and experienced psychological or behavioral scientist with academic training and expertise related to behavioral medicine, mechanisms of behavior change, and the design and conduct of behavioral and/or community interventions. The person hired for this position will play a major role in shaping the scientific agenda at the National Institute on Aging in behavior change and the development of novel interventions for adaptive aging. Our job announcement was posted today, Monday, May 5, 2014. The vacancy closes on May 14, 2014.

    Applications are submitted through usajobs.gov at the following links:

    For all US Citizens: https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/368968500
    For Federal Employees: https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/368967700

  • May 5, 2014

    U S A dot gov blog postA new NIA guest post on the USA.gov blog describes how to plan ahead before a medical emergency: "No one ever plans to be sick or disabled. But being prepared for all kinds of health situations can make all the difference in an emergency." Linking to NIA publications, the post describes how to gather important papers and give consent for advance directives. It also outlines legal and financial considerations when someone is diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease and where to get more help.

    Read the full blog post: Plan Ahead for Legal, Financial, and Medical Needs Before an Emergency

    As the U.S. government's official web portal, USA.gov connects the public to U.S. government information and services on the web.

  • April 30, 2014

    Cartoon of four people in conversation.

    Researchers tell us that recruiting older adults for research studies—especially older adults from underrepresented groups—is one of their greatest challenges.

    Dr. Nina Silverberg, assistant director of the Alzheimer’s Disease Centers Program in the NIA Division of Neuroscience, just posted a blog describing efforts in this area. A new project aims to work through local aging services and public health networks to increase awareness among diverse older adults and to include older participants in all types of research "We are developing materials, focusing on healthy aging and research participation," she explains, "with the message that 'You CAN make a difference for yourself and future generations.'”

    Read the full blog post: Encouraging older adults to participate in research

    The NIA blog publishes weekly with information on grants and funding policy, research priorities, scientific meetings, and topics of interest to researchers and others in the scientific community. Subscribe to get it weekly in your email inbox, or grab the RSS feed.

  • April 23, 2014

    Due to the overwhelming number of applications and limited availability of funds, the NIA Diversity Disability/Re-entry Supplement program will not accept applications posted electronically or via email on or after May 27, 2014. Electronic applications for the 2015 fiscal year can be submitted beginning September 30, 2014.

    Thank you for your interest and support of the NIA diversity supplement program. The training provided through these supplements allows us to recruit the most talented researchers from all groups to conduct research on aging and geriatrics and represents a priority for the National Institute on Aging.

  • April 23, 2014

    Cartoon of four people in conversation.

    The NIH recently issued a new resubmission policy for grant applications. After an unsuccessful A1 submission (or A0 submission) investigators may submit a similar application as a new (A0) application. NIH will not review the new submission for similarity to the prior application. In a new blog post, Robin Barr, director of the NIA Division of Extramural Activities explains what this means for the National Institute on Aging and invites comments from researchers in the NIA community.

    Read the full blog post: New resubmission policy

    The NIA blog publishes weekly with information on grants and funding policy, research priorities, scientific meetings, and topics of interest to researchers and others in the scientific community. Subscribe to get it weekly in your email inbox, or grab the RSS feed.

  • April 15, 2014

    Subject: Dr. Matthew Gillman May 1 at the GeroScience Interest Group (GSIG) spring seminar

    When: Thursday, May 1, 2014, 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM

    Where: Lipsett Amphitheater, Building 10, NIH

    Title: "Developmental Origins of Health and Disease: Challenges and Payoffs"

    The Trans-NIH GeroScience Interest Group (GSIG) cordially invites you to its spring seminar, featuring Dr. Matthew Gillman. Dr. Gillman is a Director, Obesity Prevention Program at Harvard Medical School/Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute and Professor, Department of Nutrition at Harvard School of Public Health. Dr. Gillman is a well-funded investigator in the area of DOHaD. Within a portfolio of observational and intervention studies, he and his colleagues are currently applying the lifespan model to a longitudinal birth cohort called Project Viva that explores the pre- and perinatal origins of obesity and dysmetabolism, asthma and allergies, and cognition and behavior. Dr. Gillman is also interested in exploiting the Project Viva birth cohort and other studies to detecting the presence of juvenile protective factors that appear to delay the onset of aging and age-related disease.

    The GeroScience Interest Group (GSIG) was formed to enhance opportunities for discussion of the intersection between the biology of aging and the biology of disease and conditions that are of interest across ICs. It is focused on basic biology, but with a longer view towards translation. If you are interested in learning more, please visit the GSIG web site (http://sigs.nih.gov/geroscience/Pages/default.aspx).

    The seminar will be videocast at http://videocast.nih.gov/ and archived in the GSIG web site.

    Sign Language Interpreters will be provided. Individuals with disabilities who need reasonable accommodation to participate in this event should contact Dr. Gilman Grave at gg37v@nih.gov or at 301/496-5593 or Dr. Ron Kohanski at kohanskir@mail.nih.gov or at 301/496-6402.

    To add this event to your calendar, please use this ICS file.

  • April 16, 2014

    Cartoon of four people in conversation.The NIA recently hired someone new to help us work with Congress, outside groups, and others who would like to interact with NIA leadership. Dr. Marie A. Bernard, NIA deputy director explains that government agencies must have a point of contact for Members of Congress and their staff. "Legislation, including appropriations, affects all aspects of biomedical research," she writes.

    Read the full blog post: Working with Congress

    The NIA blog publishes weekly with information on grants and funding policy, research priorities, scientific meetings, and topics of interest to researchers and others in the scientific community. Subscribe to get it weekly in your email inbox, or grab the RSS feed.

  • April 9, 2014

    Cartoon of four people in conversation.Different kinds of NIA grant applications receive different kinds of scores when they are reviewed. Some applications get a percentile rank, while others get a priority score. Dr. Robin Barr, director of the NIA Division of Extramural Activities, has a new blog post about this aspect of the NIA grant review process. "The answer to why we percentile some applications and not others comes down to trying to keep an even playing field for science across quite different review environments," he writes.

    Read the full blog post: Percentiling at NIA: sometimes we do. And sometimes we don’t.

    The NIA blog publishes weekly with information on grants and funding policy, research priorities, scientific meetings, and topics of interest to researchers and others in the scientific community. Subscribe to get it weekly in your email inbox, or grab the RSS feed.

  • April 7, 2014

    A rare mutation in a gene involved in RNA metabolism, which is part of the control mechanism determining protein synthesis within the cell, has been linked with development of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). This finding, from a research team led by investigators at the NIA appears in the March 30, 2014, issue of Nature Neuroscience.

    ALS, often referred to as Lou Gehrig's disease, is a rapidly progressive, fatal neurological disorder that kills about 6,000 Americans each year. The disease attacks and kills nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord; people with ALS lose strength and the ability to move their arms, legs, and body, and eventually, the ability to breathe without support. About 10 percent of people with ALS have a directly inherited form of the disease.

    Working with DNA samples from families in which several people had been diagnosed with ALS and dementia, the investigators used exome sequencing—a technique in which the entire coding regions of DNA are sequenced—to identify the mutation in the Matrin 3 gene, which is located on chromosome 5. Further investigation revealed an interaction between the Matrin 3 protein and the TDP-43 protein, an RNA-binding protein whose mutation is known to cause ALS.

    The identification of this gene mutation gives researchers another target to explore in the pathogenesis of this disease. In addition, it provides additional evidence that some disruption in RNA metabolism, an essential process within all cells, is involved in neuron death in ALS.

    Reference: Johnson JO, et al. Mutations in the Matrin 3 gene cause familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Nature Neuroscience. Published online March 30, 2014. doi:10.1038/nn.3688

     

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