Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center

Preventing Cognitive Decline in African Americans with Mild Cognitive Impairment

Preventing Cognitive Decline in African Americans with Mild Cognitive Impairment

Overall Status: 
Recruiting
Brief Description: 

The goal of this study is to determine whether increasing participation in cognitive, physical, and/or social activities prevents cognitive decline in older African Americans with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Patients with MCI are at increased risk for Alzheimer's disease. We propose that increasing participation in activities will prevent cognitive decline and may delay the onset of Alzheimer's.

Patient Qualifications: 
Min AgeMax AgeGenderHealthy Volunteers
65 Years
N/A
Both
No
Inclusion Criteria: 

  • Age 65 years or older
  • Having a friend/relative willing to serve as a Knowledgeable Informant (KI)
  • Diagnosis of amnestic MCI-multiple domain subtype
  • Self-identified as African American

Exclusion Criteria: 

  • Psychiatric diagnosis, including dementia and major depression
  • Sensory deficits that preclude neuropsychological testing
  • Institutional residence
  • Reduced life expectancy due to known terminal illness

Detailed Description: 

The goal of this study is to determine whether increasing participation in activities prevents cognitive decline in African Americans 65 and older with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). We will test the use of Behavioral Activation (BA), a behavioral treatment, as a way to increase activities and thus improve function and mood. As patients do more (through activation) and perceive the benefit (i.e., feel better), their activity levels increase. BA promotes activities that reflect an individual's preferences and goals, which in turn enhances mood and motivation to remain active. The control treatment is Supportive Therapy (ST), which is a nondirective, supportive therapy that is based on empathy, reflection, and support. 

We hypothesize that BA-treated subjects will have fewer declines in cognitive and functional abilities, fewer depressive and neuropsychiatric symptoms, and better quality of life than ST-treated subjects at 24 months. Most clinical trials for MCI have tested pharmacologic treatments and have enrolled mostly Whites; their results may not apply to African Americans, whose life experiences and medical and genetic characteristics may exert unique effects.

Those with MCI are a high-risk population for whom interventions to prevent cognitive decline are particularly important. Because African Americans comprise one of the largest minority groups in the U.S., suffer disparities in health outcomes, and are unlikely to seek pharmacologic treatments or participate in clinical drug trials, there is an urgent need to enroll older African Americans in nonpharmacologic intervention studies of cognition.

Locations: 
Map Marker CityStateZip CodeStatusPrimary Contact

Geolocation is 39.9559288, -75.1574567

Site
Philadelphia
Pennsylvania
19107
Recruiting
Name: Robin J Casten, PhD
Phone: 215-503-1250
Email: Robin.Casten@jefferson.edu
Lead Sponsor: 
Agency
Thomas Jefferson University
Collaborator Sponsor: 
Agency
Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center
Johns Hopkins University
University of Pennsylvania
National Institute on Aging (NIA)
Facility Investigators: 
NameRoleAffiliation
Robin J. Casten, PhD
Study Director
Thomas Jefferson University
Study Contact: 
NamePhoneEmail
Robin J. Casten, PhD
215-503-1250
Barry W. Rovner, MD
215-503-1254
Locations
 
 
ClinicalTrials.gov ID 
Official Title: 
Preventing Cognitive Decline in African Americans with Mild Cognitive Impairment
Study Start Date: 
September 2010
Study End Date: 
August 2015
Enrollment: 
200