Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center

Genes, Exercise, Memory, and Neurodegeneration

Genes, Exercise, Memory, and Neurodegeneration

Overall Status: 
Completed
Brief Description: 

The primary purpose of this pilot study is to determine whether African Americans with mild Alzheimer's disease can be enrolled and retained in a 6-month aerobic exercise-training study.

Patient Qualifications: 
Min AgeMax AgeGenderHealthy Volunteers
60 Years
N/A
Both
No
Inclusion Criteria: 

  • Age over 60 years
  • Ability to exercise vigorously without causing harm to self
  • Mild Alzheimer's disease
  • Study partner
  • Good general health
  • Willing to exercise for 6 months
  • Body Mass Index (BMI) less than 37
  • Women participants must be postmenopausal for at least 2 years and maintain current hormone replacement therapy status; allowed medication usage for the duration of the study

Exclusion Criteria: 

  • MMSE score below 20
  • TG (Triglyceride) greater than 400 mg/dl
  • LDL-C levels greater than 95% or HDL-C levels less than 10% of age and sex-adjusted norms

Detailed Description: 

Although anticholinesterase therapies have greatly improved symptomatic treatment of Alzheimer's disease, they have not been demonstrated to significantly slow disease progression. Preservation of intellectual dexterity among those showing earliest symptoms of Alzheimer's may ameliorate the burden associated with the disease. An evidence-based lifestyle approach is emerging as an alternative or adjunct to anticholinesterase therapy. Specifically, aerobic exercise training has been demonstrated to improve cognitive function.

The mechanism by which an effect occurs is yet to be systematically substantiated. Aerobic fitness can improve many of the putative Alzheimer's disease risk factors, such as high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, inflammation, and arteriolosclerosis. However, improvements in these putative risk factors have not been explored as potential mechanisms by which aerobic training improves cognitive function in humans.

Given that African Americans have higher incidence and prevalence of Alzheimer's disease and are more sedentary relative to Caucasians, a randomized controlled trial of exercise and cognition in older African Americans is imperative.

Locations: 
Map Marker CityStateZip CodeStatusPrimary Contact

Geolocation is 38.9178427, -77.0218255

Site
Washington
District of Columbia
20060
Name:
Phone:

Geolocation is 40.012545, -75.1487007

Site
Philadelphia
Pennsylvania
19140
Name:
Phone:
Lead Sponsor: 
Agency
National Institute on Aging (NIA)
Collaborator Sponsor: 
Facility Investigators: 
NameRoleAffiliation
Thomas O. Obisesan, MD, MPH
Principal Investigator
Howard University
Study Contact: 
NamePhoneEmail
Thomas O. Obisesan, MD, MPH
202-865-3776
Locations
 
 
ClinicalTrials.gov ID 
NCT01021644 (follow link to view full record on ct.gov in new window)
Official Title: 
Effects of Standardized Aerobic Exercise Training on Neurocognitive and Neurodegeneration
Study Start Date: 
October 2009
Study End Date: 
August 2011
Disease Stage: 
Early
Enrollment: 
112