About NIA

NIA and the American Recovery & Reinvestment Act of 2009

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) was signed into law by President Obama on February 17th, 2009. ARRA was created to jumpstart the economy, create or save millions of jobs, and put a down payment on addressing long-neglected challenges so our country can thrive in the 21st century.

NIA Research Funding Supported Through ARRA

Award Type

RFA#

Total # NIA Projects

Total $s NIA Awards

Challenge Grants (RC1)

RFA-OD-09-003

42

36,872,763

GO Grants (RC2)

RFA-OD-09-004

23

106,306,083

New Faculty Recruitment (P30)

RFA-OD-09-005

7

5,919,893

Academic Research Enhancement Awards (R15)

RFA-OD-09-007

3

1,057,723

Spurring the Acceleration of New Technologies (RC3)

RFA-OD-09-008

1

2,305,646

Small Business Catalyst Awards for Accelerating Innovative Research (R43)

RFA-OD-09-009

2

398,374

Building Sustainable Community-Linked Infrastructure to Enable Health Science Research (RC4)

RFA-OD-09-010

5

4,089,022

Grants for Methodology Development and Nudging Implementation of Comparative Effectiveness Research (RC4)

RFA-OD-10-001, 002, 008, and 009

13

34,406,375

NIH Director’s Opportunity for Research in Five Thematic Areas (RC4)

RFA-OD-10-005

3

14,999,758

Research Fellowships (F30s, F31s, F32s)

N/A

29

2,693,003

Institutional Training Grants (T32s)

N/A

8

3,094,372

Other New Grants and Grant Renewals

N/A

101

135,722,299

Supplements to Existing Grants 1

N/A

204

45,840,779

Totals NIA ARRA

 

441

393,706,090

1 Includes competitive revisions to existing grants (Notice OD-09-058); administrative supplements to Research Project Grants, SBIR grants, Center grants, and Research Career grants (Notice OD-09-056); and Summer Research Experience administrative supplements (Notice OD-09-060)

NIA ARRA Investment Reports

NIH has released a collection of Recovery Act Investment Reports highlighting investments in biomedical research topics all made possible by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). These reports are designed to describe, in plain language, the needs for research on specific diseases or other health-related topics and how ARRA-funded projects are addressing these needs. The following reports offer highlights of NIA's ARRA-funded research. For additional NIH reports, go to http://report.nih.gov/recovery/investmentreports/.

Featured NIA-Funded ARRA Research Projects:

  • NIH ARRA Stories: Aging: Read stories about the scientists and aging research supported by NIH ARRA funding.
  • Recovery Funds Advance Alzheimer's Disease Research: November 23, 2009 -- American Recovery and Reinvestment Funds are being used to promote the national research efforts to better understand, diagnose and treat Alzheimer's disease. The National Institute on Aging (NIA) has targeted promising areas of research in granting the awards, such as new and ongoing studies to identify additional risk factor genes associated with Alzheimer's, improve diagnostic tools, find biomarkers, develop therapies, conduct clinical trials and explore preventive measures.
  • Recovery Act Funding Seeks to Help Understand Basic Secrets of Aging: November 23, 2009 -- The National Institute on Aging (NIA) today announced two major awards to advance exciting areas of basic research on aging. Grants for studies to determine the potential healthy aging effects of rapamycin, a compound involved in regulating cell growth, and to understand the causes of protein misfolding—when a protein is either not formed correctly or damaged afterwards—that lead to age-related disease are made possible through American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding.
  • What Can Prevent Walking Disability in Older People? November 4, 2009 -- The National Institute on Aging (NIA), part of the National Institutes of Health, today announced the award of $29.5 million in grant support over the next two years to determine whether a specific physical activity program can stave off disability in older people. The funding will begin the Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders—LIFE— trial, the largest ever undertaken to prevent mobility disability among older people who are at risk of losing their ability to walk and to live independently in the community. The grant is being awarded to the University of Florida's Institute on Aging in Gainesville.
  • NIA Extends Research on Health, Economics of Older Americans: October 29, 2009 -- The National Institute on Aging (NIA), part of the National Institutes of Health, today announced the award of four grants totaling more than $19 million over the next two years to expand the Health and Retirement Study (HRS), the nation's premier long-term study and data resource on the combined health, economic, and social factors influencing the well-being of Americans over age 50. The awards, made possible through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, are part of the $5 billion that President Obama announced Sept. 30 on the NIH campus. They will supplement the cooperative agreement between the NIA and the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, which conducts the study.